European law – Europa Site http://europasite.net/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 19:39:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://europasite.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T150327.373-150x150.png European law – Europa Site http://europasite.net/ 32 32 EU highest court says Turkey should amend law on insults to president https://europasite.net/eu-highest-court-says-turkey-should-amend-law-on-insults-to-president/ https://europasite.net/eu-highest-court-says-turkey-should-amend-law-on-insults-to-president/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 12:31:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-highest-court-says-turkey-should-amend-law-on-insults-to-president/ Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan speaks at a press conference following his meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel (not pictured) at the Huber Mansion in Istanbul, Turkey, October 16, 2021. REUTERS / Murad Sezer ISTANBUL, Oct. 19 (Reuters) – Europe’s highest human rights court on Tuesday called on Turkey to amend a law concerning insults to […]]]>

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan speaks at a press conference following his meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel (not pictured) at the Huber Mansion in Istanbul, Turkey, October 16, 2021. REUTERS / Murad Sezer

ISTANBUL, Oct. 19 (Reuters) – Europe’s highest human rights court on Tuesday called on Turkey to amend a law concerning insults to the president under which tens of thousands of people were prosecuted, after ruled that the detention of a man under the law violated his freedom of expression.

Vedat Sorli was given an 11-month suspended prison sentence in 2017 for a cartoon and photo of President Tayyip Erdogan he shared on Facebook, as well as satirical and critical comments.

There was no justification for Sorli’s detention and provisional arrest or the imposition of a criminal sanction, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) said.

“Such a sanction, by its very nature, inevitably has a chilling effect on the willingness of the person concerned to express his point of view on matters of public interest,” he said.

The criminal proceedings against Sorli were “incompatible with freedom of expression,” the court added.

Thousands of people have been charged and convicted of the crime of insulting Erdogan in the seven years since he rose from prime minister to president.

In 2020, 31,297 investigations were opened in connection with the prosecution, 7,790 cases were closed and 3,325 resulted in convictions, according to data from the Ministry of Justice. These figures were slightly lower than the previous year.

Since 2014, when Erdogan became president, 160,169 investigations have been opened for insulting the president, 35,507 cases have been filed and there have been 12,881 convictions.

In an important case earlier this year, a court sentenced pro-Kurdish politician Selahattin Demirtas to 3.5 years for insulting Erdogan, one of the longest sentences for the crime, according to Demirtas’ lawyer.

The ECHR has stated that Turkey’s law on insults to the president grants the head of state privileged status in relation to the transmission of information and opinions about them.

He said the law should be amended to guarantee people the freedom to hold opinions and spread ideas without interference from the authorities in order to end the violation found in Sorli’s case.

Additional reports by Ece Toksabay; Editing by Dominic Evans

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Borrell of EU “optimistic” about possible new talks with Iran https://europasite.net/borrell-of-eu-optimistic-about-possible-new-talks-with-iran/ https://europasite.net/borrell-of-eu-optimistic-about-possible-new-talks-with-iran/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 15:13:26 +0000 https://europasite.net/borrell-of-eu-optimistic-about-possible-new-talks-with-iran/ The EU’s top diplomat Josep Borrell said on Monday he hoped EU and Iranian diplomats would meet soon to discuss a possible return to nuclear talks, but declined to confirm reports of ‘a meeting in Brussels on Thursday. A senior EU official said last week that Iran was not yet ready to resume meaningful talks […]]]>

The EU’s top diplomat Josep Borrell said on Monday he hoped EU and Iranian diplomats would meet soon to discuss a possible return to nuclear talks, but declined to confirm reports of ‘a meeting in Brussels on Thursday.

A senior EU official said last week that Iran was not yet ready to resume meaningful talks with world powers over its nuclear program and related US sanctions, but that it could discuss with the EU texts in Brussels which would then be presented. Iran’s Fars news agency said talks could take place on Thursday, citing a lawmaker on Sunday after a meeting with Iran’s foreign minister. Borrell, speaking as he arrived for a meeting of EU foreign ministers on Monday, said he was becoming more optimistic.

“No confirmation yet, but things are improving and I hope we will have preparatory meetings in Brussels in the days to come,” Borrell said in Luxembourg as he arrived for a meeting of foreign ministers from the EU. “You never know, I am more optimistic today than yesterday”. Western diplomats said they feared Tehran’s new negotiating team – led by a president known to be an anti-Western hardline supporter rather than pragmatic like his predecessor – might make demands beyond the scope of what had already been agreed.

Some also say they fear Iran is trying to buy time by talking to the EU rather than all parties to the deal, including the United States. Iran has long denied any ambition to acquire nuclear weapons and accused the United States of unfair treatment.

EU political director Enrique Mora, chief coordinator of the talks, was in Tehran on Thursday to meet with the Iranian nuclear negotiating team, four months after talks between Iran and world powers broke down as Ebrahim Raisi was elected Iranian president. The Iranian establishment has so far refused to resume indirect talks with the United States in Vienna on both sides reverting to respect for the deal, under which Iran has limited its nuclear program in return for relief economic sanctions.

The deal effectively collapsed after former US President Donald Trump reimposed sanctions on Iran in 2018 and Tehran resumed building its stockpile of enriched uranium. French Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Anne-Claire Legendre said on Monday that Paris had not been informed of any meeting in Brussels later this week and insisted that such a meeting could not replace the talks in Vienna.

“These exchanges cannot replace the negotiations in Vienna with the other participants in the JCPoA and the United States,” she told reporters. “These negotiations were halted at Tehran’s request four months ago now, and Iran has yet to commit to a date for their resumption.”

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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Whistleblower rules will be extended just before the EU deadline https://europasite.net/whistleblower-rules-will-be-extended-just-before-the-eu-deadline/ https://europasite.net/whistleblower-rules-will-be-extended-just-before-the-eu-deadline/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 07:14:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/whistleblower-rules-will-be-extended-just-before-the-eu-deadline/ Justice Minister Edward Zammit Lewis will propose further amendments to the Whistleblower Act next week, with the aim of ending Malta’s statute overdue in the transposition of the EU’s whistleblower directive. ‘alert. The Labor government introduced Malta’s first whistleblower law in 2013, but now has until December 17, 2021 to fully transpose a broader EU […]]]>

Justice Minister Edward Zammit Lewis will propose further amendments to the Whistleblower Act next week, with the aim of ending Malta’s statute overdue in the transposition of the EU’s whistleblower directive. ‘alert.

The Labor government introduced Malta’s first whistleblower law in 2013, but now has until December 17, 2021 to fully transpose a broader EU directive to protect those who report wrongdoing in workplaces and public places. private and public offices.

The changes will extend legal protection to those who report fraud, bribery and bribery at work in private workplaces, as well as to self-employed, self-employed or even in recruitment situations.

Large organizations are also expected to have suitable structures that facilitate internal and external reporting by whistleblowers.

The EU Directive sets out the requirements of the regulations of the EU Member States with regard to the protection of whistleblowers and disclosures.

The directive deals with the conditions for the protection of whistleblowers; internal, external and public disclosure reporting procedures; the establishment of competent authorities to receive, provide feedback and follow up on reports; and the penalties imposed on those who obstruct or retaliate against whistleblowers.

The law will cover not only the public sector and local councils, but also private sector legal entities with more than 50 workers.

Currently in Malta, the Whistleblower Act applies to government ministries, private companies with more than 250 employees with an annual turnover of more than 50 million euros, and NGOs that collect more than 500,000 euros thanks to public collections and other donations.

Based on a recent study conducted by Transparency International, 56% of Maltese residents believe that corruption cannot be reported without fear of retaliation.


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Conflict between UK and EU over Northern Ireland Protocol amid growing national tensions https://europasite.net/conflict-between-uk-and-eu-over-northern-ireland-protocol-amid-growing-national-tensions/ https://europasite.net/conflict-between-uk-and-eu-over-northern-ireland-protocol-amid-growing-national-tensions/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 03:04:08 +0000 https://europasite.net/conflict-between-uk-and-eu-over-northern-ireland-protocol-amid-growing-national-tensions/ Political hostilities have again erupted between Britain and the European Union over the Northern Ireland Protocol. Agreed as part of the Brexit deal reached in early 2020, the protocol governs the passage of goods between the UK and EU economic areas, where a hard border, or extensive border infrastructure, between Northern Ireland and an EU […]]]>

Political hostilities have again erupted between Britain and the European Union over the Northern Ireland Protocol.

Agreed as part of the Brexit deal reached in early 2020, the protocol governs the passage of goods between the UK and EU economic areas, where a hard border, or extensive border infrastructure, between Northern Ireland and an EU member state, the Republic of Ireland would jeopardize the 1998 Good Friday Agreement, which ended decades of armed conflict in the north.

Vehicles at the port of Larne, Northern Ireland on Tuesday February 2, 2021 (AP Photo / Peter Morrison)

Under the deal, Northern Ireland remains in the EU’s single market for goods from which the rest of the UK has withdrawn. EU product inspections and customs checks on goods arriving from the UK are carried out at ports in Northern Ireland immediately after crossing the Irish Sea and can then move freely throughout the UK. island of Ireland. This drew opposition from large sections of the Conservative Party and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) in Northern Ireland, who complained that a border had indeed been established in the Irish Sea.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson endorsed the 2019 deal in that year’s general election as a way to ‘get Brexit done’. But antagonisms have since erupted, with the deal threatened by both sides earlier this year and the EU briefly invoking Article 16, which allows one party to unilaterally suspend elements of the deal.

Since then, talks aimed at defusing the situation have only highlighted the national tensions between Britain and the EU, at a time of growing tensions within the European Union itself.

UK Brexit Minister Lord Frost has called for the protocol to be scrapped and all customs controls between Britain and Northern Ireland removed, allowing goods to move freely if they comply with regulations British or European. He also wants the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to be withdrawn from arbitration of future disputes over the agreement, demanding “international arbitration instead of a system of EU law ultimately controlled by the court of law. one of the parties, the European Court of Justice “.

EU chief Brexit negotiator Maroš Šefčovič on Wednesday offered a series of concessions to the UK’s position, including measures to cut controls on UK retail products by 80%, to cut customs formalities in half, drop the requirement for manufacturers of medical products to leave Northern Ireland for Great Britain and streamline the certification process for road freight. He said the EU had “completely changed our rules” to find an agreement. He insisted: “It is very clear that we cannot have access to the single market without the supervision of the ECJ.

Discussions on the EU’s proposals will last a maximum of three weeks. Commentators have referred to the adoption of a Swiss-style treaty as a possible final compromise. Disputes between Switzerland and the EU are handled by an independent arbitration panel, although it must take into account the opinion of the ECJ on questions of EU law. But the comments suggest Britain will demand “the moon,” in the words of an EU diplomat addressing the Financial Time (FT).


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Spain plans ‘additions’ to controversial electricity bill recovery law https://europasite.net/spain-plans-additions-to-controversial-electricity-bill-recovery-law/ https://europasite.net/spain-plans-additions-to-controversial-electricity-bill-recovery-law/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 20:35:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/spain-plans-additions-to-controversial-electricity-bill-recovery-law/ High voltage power lines and an electricity pylon are pictured at dusk outside Madrid, Spain on September 29, 2021. REUTERS / Susana Vera MADRID, Oct. 14 (Reuters) – Spain plans to introduce “additional measures” for a newly approved bill, opposed by some companies and investors, which clogs some profits from power companies in a bid […]]]>

High voltage power lines and an electricity pylon are pictured at dusk outside Madrid, Spain on September 29, 2021. REUTERS / Susana Vera

MADRID, Oct. 14 (Reuters) – Spain plans to introduce “additional measures” for a newly approved bill, opposed by some companies and investors, which clogs some profits from power companies in a bid to protect consumers from sky-rocketing energy prices, Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said on Thursday.

“We will achieve (reasonable prices) with the measures we have taken and others that we may still take,” Sanchez said, adding that utilities that do not reap extraordinary profits from gas prices will be spared. the decree ratified Thursday.

The idea of ​​a centralized purchasing process in which European countries jointly negotiate and acquire gas reserves is gaining ground in Brussels, Sanchez said in a television interview, noting that the process was “unfortunately still slow”.

Sanchez’s comments about possible additional measures to be taken in the future echoed those of his Energy and Environment Minister Teresa Ribera earlier Thursday.

Companies, including wind power leader Iberdrola (IBE.MC) have complained to the European Union about the decree, which is part of Spain’s response to a global surge in electricity prices caused in part by strong demand from economies recovering from COVID-19 and low gas inventories. . Read more

“Algeria’s gas supplies are secure – although we have a geopolitical conflict,” Sanchez said. “It would be more secure if we had a strategic European reserve.”

The clawback bill originally planned to skim some € 2.6 billion from corporate profits, but the cost is now likely to be higher as it is tied to gas prices which have still increased since its introduction.

Ribera told lawmakers she hoped to come up with “additional measures” in the coming weeks, adding on Twitter that these would offer “reasonable prices to the industry and more protection to vulnerable consumers.”

She did not give more details on what the additional measures might be, but the actions of the companies most affected have nonetheless recovered some of the ground they had lost since the decree was unveiled.

Iberdrola shares have traded more than 2% higher, having lost 7.5% of their market value since mid-September. The Enel Endesa (ELE.MC) unit, which unlike Iberdrola is only active in Spain, has climbed more than 3%, having previously lost more than 10%.

“This is a positive message to give regulatory certainty and accelerate the energy transition, but my question is whether the approved regulations could cause exactly the opposite,” said Fernando Garcia, director of research on utility stocks. Europeans at RBC Capital Markets.

After a heated debate, Congress ratified the decree with 182 votes in favor and 150 against, although the regulation is technically already in force.

Additional reporting by Jesús Aguado, Belen Carreno and Clara-Laeila Laudette; Editing by Kirsten Donovan and David Gregorio

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Pole Kaczynski leaves government post to focus on party leadership https://europasite.net/pole-kaczynski-leaves-government-post-to-focus-on-party-leadership/ https://europasite.net/pole-kaczynski-leaves-government-post-to-focus-on-party-leadership/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 12:45:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/pole-kaczynski-leaves-government-post-to-focus-on-party-leadership/ Jaroslaw Kaczynski, leader of the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party, attends a vote in the parliamentary elections at a polling station in Warsaw, Poland, October 13, 2019. REUTERS / Kacper Pempel WARSAW, October 13 (Reuters) – Leader of Poland’s ruling party Jaroslaw Kaczynski on Wednesday said he would step down from his government post […]]]>

Jaroslaw Kaczynski, leader of the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party, attends a vote in the parliamentary elections at a polling station in Warsaw, Poland, October 13, 2019. REUTERS / Kacper Pempel

WARSAW, October 13 (Reuters) – Leader of Poland’s ruling party Jaroslaw Kaczynski on Wednesday said he would step down from his government post to devote more time to leading the party, two sources in the know told Reuters of the file, confirming a report published by the official news agency. PAP agency.

Kaczynski, 72, is widely regarded as Poland’s de facto ruler and will remain key to the leadership of the nationalist Law and Justice (PiS) party as he contemplates parliamentary elections in 2023, while facing a majority unstable parliament and aggravating conflicts with the European Union. Union.

“He wants to devote himself to the party,” said one of the sources.

PAP reported that Kaczynski said at a meeting of the PiS parliamentary group that he would step down from his government post in early 2022.

The twin brother of the late President Lech Kaczynski, who died in a plane crash in 2010, returned to government in October 2020 as Deputy Prime Minister responsible for national security and defense.

PiS spokespersons could not be reached immediately for comment.

The party remains top in opinion polls, in part thanks to its generous welfare programs, despite growing conflict with the EU over accusations that the far-right PiS has put the state in jeopardy. rights, media freedoms and LGBT rights.

Reporting by Alan Charlish, Anna Koper, Pawel Florkiewicz Editing by Gareth Jones and Mark Heinrich

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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EU unity faces new test in Brexit row in Northern Ireland – POLITICO https://europasite.net/eu-unity-faces-new-test-in-brexit-row-in-northern-ireland-politico/ https://europasite.net/eu-unity-faces-new-test-in-brexit-row-in-northern-ireland-politico/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 02:46:10 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-unity-faces-new-test-in-brexit-row-in-northern-ireland-politico/ LONDON – A British decision to suspend the post-Brexit protocol in Northern Ireland could be a major test of European unity. The protocol, which aims to avoid the need for a land border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to the south, has long been Brexit’s most complex conundrum. The compromise reached in […]]]>

LONDON – A British decision to suspend the post-Brexit protocol in Northern Ireland could be a major test of European unity.

The protocol, which aims to avoid the need for a land border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to the south, has long been Brexit’s most complex conundrum. The compromise reached in the Brexit talks has kept Northern Ireland aligned with key elements of EU law, but the two sides disagree on its implementation.

Discussions between Brussels and London over the controversial trade deals intensify this month, with the EU due to present a new set of proposals on Wednesday and the UK expected to provide more details on its own ideas next week.

Yet member states are not yet determined on how far to go in response if the UK pushes the nuclear button – and some fear that a trade war with Britain will be damaging to both sides.

POLITICO has spoken with officials and diplomats on both sides to determine what could happen if Boris Johnson’s government decides to act.

What the row is about

Britain wants EU to reduce the scope of border checks on goods shipped to Northern Ireland from England, Scotland and Wales, amid major business disruption and deep anger Unionist politicians from Northern Ireland, who see the arrangement as an obstacle between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK

But the UK’s pro-reform rhetoric – outlined in a document released in July – would effectively require Brussels to trust its assurances that restricted goods cannot enter the EU’s single market through the Republic of ‘Ireland. The EU has warned Britain not to expect a meaningful renegotiation.

Compromises could emerge in areas such as simplifying customs processes for goods transiting from Britain to Northern Ireland, including medicines, but this will not meet all of the UK’s demands. At the crux of the matter is Britain’s attempt to change several aspects of the protocol that were controversial during the Brexit divorce negotiations and which the EU considers settled since the Withdrawal Agreement became international law. .

These include the application of EU state aid rules in Northern Ireland and the oversight of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) with regard to EU law. in the region – surveillance that the UK wants to remove. The latter is the biggest demand in the eyes of the European Commission, which sees it as an ideological demand from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson rather than an issue directly affecting businesses and citizens of Ireland from North.

The Commission now accepts that the UK is likely to unilaterally suspend parts of the protocol before Christmas through its Article 16 mechanism, which allows each party to act to avoid trade problems or “serious economic, societal or environmental “. Johnson and his Brexit interlocutor David Frost have made it clear that they believe this test has already been met.

What could the UK do?

The Commission’s formal response to the UK’s proposal – expected on Wednesday – is expected to include an exception for “national identity food products”, allowing sausages and other products to enter Northern Ireland from Great Britain. Brittany after the end of previously agreed grace periods, an EU said the official.

Frost will submit a new legal text to the Commission this week, laying the groundwork for a new protocol.

In a speech in Lisbon on Tuesday, Frost will warn that the EU’s proposals are insufficient. He will pressure the bloc to completely abolish its ban on British chilled meats entering Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK and remove ECJ oversight in the region, arguing that the court “has created a profound imbalance in the functioning of the protocol “.

This will open a period of intense talks that London would like to last no longer than three weeks, Frost told the Conservative Party conference. According to this timetable, Britain will refrain from taking any unilateral action until at least mid-November.

The UK should opt for a partial suspension, limited to areas where no compromise is found. This could be achieved by refusing to implement Articles 5 and 7 of the Protocol, which deal with customs duties on goods entering Northern Ireland from any other part of the UK as well as certification and standards .

Depending on the outcome of the talks, the UK could also add Article 10 to the mix. This obliges the UK to notify Brussels of any state subsidy decisions benefiting UK companies supplying goods to Northern Ireland. The rewrite of Article 10 is one of Frost’s main requests.

Suspending the protocol – seen as a worst-case scenario by the bloc but backed even by the most moderate members of Johnson’s cabinet – would give Britain the opportunity to impose its own solutions. London would buy time to gather evidence to back up its hypothesis that the UK’s approach does not really undermine the EU’s single market, and to persuade member states that retaliatory trade measures would be more painful for their own. savings than for the UK

How would the EU react?

The ball would then be in the EU’s court. Article 16 of the protocol gives the bloc the opportunity to retaliate with “proportionate rebalancing measures” if the UK does not live up to its terms. Although this is a distant prospect, the possibility of tariffs on valuable UK exports such as cars has already been discussed.

“There would be a trade war,” said an EU diplomat when asked what the EU’s response would be. “But it won’t be immediate.”

The weather, however, is on Britain’s side. The UK would have to give Brussels a month’s notice before invoking Article 16. This would launch a lengthy consultation process in the EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee, where the EU is represented by Commission Vice-President Maroš Šefčovič and the United Kingdom by Frost.

The EU will then consider its options and likely reactivate two pending lawsuits it launched against the UK in March. It was only once all its legal avenues were exhausted that tariffs would be imposed.

The Commission remains in “no-escalation mode” and has focused on finding solutions, an EU official said. Work on a UK response began before the summer, but officials preferred not to have a list of potential measures that could be leaked to the press and poisoned talks.

Yet recent threats from Frost and growing anxiety among EU countries have prompted the Commission to reactivate this work and it now plans to consult with EU ambassadors in Brussels on faster retaliatory measures, a said one of the diplomats.

Why this could put a strain on unity

Agreeing on an EU-wide response to Article 16 will be a delicate balancing act. Diplomats from some member countries are worried about the impact tariffs could have on their own national economies as they attempt to recover from the pandemic.

“The exact retaliation, how quickly it occurs and how hard it bites will be a test for EU unity,” said Raoul Ruparel, former Brexit adviser to Theresa May as prime minister British.

Two diplomats expressed France’s anger against AUKUS, the new Indo-Pacific alliance which caused Paris to lose a multibillion dollar contract to build submarines for Australia; an ongoing dispute with Britain over Channel fishing licenses; and a dispute over asylum seekers crossing the Channel could cause it to push other EU capitals beyond what they are willing to accept.

“The root of the problem, in a way, is the very poor state of Franco-British relations,” said Charles Grant, director of the Center for European Reform think tank. “It is so bad that it makes the French quite reluctant to help the British on Brexit issues. And the French are of course very influential on European institutions.

Grant argued that if the UK “started to take diplomacy seriously” and tried “to behave better and make friends in Europe, then there would be a threat to unity because everyone wouldn’t want to follow the hard line the French are taking. . “

A trade war would be a negative outcome for all parties, so EU countries will do everything possible to avoid tariffs, said a fourth diplomat, who represents a member country with high levels of bilateral trade with the UK.

“History has shown that EU countries have stood united on Brexit because everyone agreed that upholding the integrity of the single market was more important than any benefit one could have bilaterally with the UK, ”they said. And they insisted, “Unity will prevail.

The measures under consideration include the permanent suspension of a memorandum of understanding on financial services, negotiated by the UK Treasury and the Commission earlier this year but not yet signed by EU governments. Freezing Britain’s participation in Horizon Europe, the EU’s research and development program – which the UK hopes to join this year – is also launched.

Yet Ruparel believes neither of these two measures would force a shift in Britain’s stance given the strength of sentiment over the Downing Street Protocol – amid high tariffs on cars and other major exports or the suspension of data equivalence may well do. “The only really strict enforcement of the EU here is the pain it can cause in the UK – and is that pain costing the UK more than it appreciates what it wants to do in North Ireland ? “


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EU in crisis after Polish court ruling https://europasite.net/eu-in-crisis-after-polish-court-ruling/ https://europasite.net/eu-in-crisis-after-polish-court-ruling/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 00:41:43 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-in-crisis-after-polish-court-ruling/ “We must make it clear that this government in Poland is playing with fire,” Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said upon his arrival for a meeting of EU ministers in Luxembourg. “The primacy of European law is essential for the integration of Europe and living together in Europe. If this principle is violated, Europe as […]]]>

“We must make it clear that this government in Poland is playing with fire,” Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said upon his arrival for a meeting of EU ministers in Luxembourg.

“The primacy of European law is essential for the integration of Europe and living together in Europe. If this principle is violated, Europe as we know it, as it was built with the Treaties of Rome, will cease to exist.

The internal Poland-EU crisis comes even as Poland faces the external challenge of the flow of migrants from the Middle East to its borders through Belarus. The Belarusian government is angry with the EU for imposing sanctions after Minsk cracked down on political dissidents who oppose the regime of strongman Alexander Lukashenko.

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Brussels officials have said Thursday’s court ruling could result in a series of fines and lawsuits against Warsaw that will take months, if not years, to unfold.

The PiS says it has no ‘Polexit’ plan and, unlike Britain before its Brexit referendum in 2016, popular support for EU membership is high in Poland.

Poland’s membership of the bloc since 2004 has contributed to one of the fastest growing economies in Europe. With an increasingly assertive Russia pissing off some central and eastern European states that were decades under Communist rule, many Poles see the EU as an essential part of national security.

But, welcoming the court ruling, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said that every member state should be treated with respect and that the EU should not be “a grouping of those who are equal and more equal”.

The Constitutional Court took up the case after Morawiecki asked it if the EU institutions could prevent Poland from reorganizing its judicial system.

A Eurobarometer survey carried out in June and July 2021 showed that almost twice as many Poles trust the EU as their own national government.

“I think (…) that there is a risk that we can get out of the EU, because all these actions that are happening can lead to this step by step,” said Warsaw retiree Grazyna Gulbinowicz.

“I think it would have a very negative impact on our overall situation, because things are not easy and without European funds it will be even more difficult, not to mention that we will feel isolated.” ($ 1 = 3.9872 zlotys)

Reuters

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Latest updates: European gas prices fall after US and Russia allay fears https://europasite.net/latest-updates-european-gas-prices-fall-after-us-and-russia-allay-fears/ https://europasite.net/latest-updates-european-gas-prices-fall-after-us-and-russia-allay-fears/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:38:55 +0000 https://europasite.net/latest-updates-european-gas-prices-fall-after-us-and-russia-allay-fears/ UK house prices recorded the biggest monthly increase in more than 14 years in September as stamp duty cuts ended as the ‘race for space’ pushed buyers to look beyond from London. Average home prices rose 1.7 percent last month from August, the fastest monthly gain since February 2007, according to data from mortgage provider […]]]>

UK house prices recorded the biggest monthly increase in more than 14 years in September as stamp duty cuts ended as the ‘race for space’ pushed buyers to look beyond from London.

Average home prices rose 1.7 percent last month from August, the fastest monthly gain since February 2007, according to data from mortgage provider Halifax.

Compared to the same month last year, house prices rose 7.4%, an acceleration from 7.2% the month before, pushing the average home to just over 267,500 £, the highest on record.

September’s price spike “shows that the pandemic boom is still alive and well,” said Jonathan Hopper, managing director of Garrington Property Finders.

The end of the stamp duty holidays in England and homebuyers’ desire to close deals quickly may have played a role in those numbers, said Russell Galley, chief executive of Halifax.

The rapid rise reflects other factors, as most of the mortgages agreed in September would not have been concluded before the tax break expires, he added.

From October, the thresholds at which buyers in England and Northern Ireland could avoid paying stamp duty will drop from £ 250,000 to £ 125,000, the level before July 2020, when the tax holiday was cut. introduced to stimulate the housing market after the first nationwide foreclosure. Until July 1, the threshold was £ 500,000.

“The ‘space race’ as people changed their preferences and lifestyle choices has undoubtedly had a major impact,” said Galley. Apartment prices rose 6.1%, compared to 8.9% for semi-detached properties and 8.8% for single-family homes.

Greater London remains the outlier, growing only 1% annually, and was once again the only region or nation to record a drop in house prices in the last rolling three-month period.

“The driving force [of the price rise] Now are the old-fashioned market fundamentals and the chronic imbalance of supply and demand, ”Hopper said.


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EU to support five-year targets during COP26 climate negotiations https://europasite.net/eu-to-support-five-year-targets-during-cop26-climate-negotiations/ https://europasite.net/eu-to-support-five-year-targets-during-cop26-climate-negotiations/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:59:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-to-support-five-year-targets-during-cop26-climate-negotiations/ Flags of the European Union fly in front of the headquarters of the European Commission in Brussels, Belgium, July 14, 2021. REUTERS / Yves Herman / File Photo BRUSSELS, Oct.6 (Reuters) – The European Union on Wednesday agreed to support five-year climate targets at the COP26 climate change conference, where countries will try to finalize […]]]>

Flags of the European Union fly in front of the headquarters of the European Commission in Brussels, Belgium, July 14, 2021. REUTERS / Yves Herman / File Photo

BRUSSELS, Oct.6 (Reuters) – The European Union on Wednesday agreed to support five-year climate targets at the COP26 climate change conference, where countries will try to finalize the rules needed to implement the Paris Agreement.

At the COP26 summit, to be held in Glasgow from October 31 to November 12, countries will try to unlock years of negotiations on technical rules. One question they will address is whether their climate goals under the 2015 Paris Agreement should follow a “common timetable”.

Environment ministers from EU countries agreed on Wednesday to support the view that countries should set climate targets every five years. Some EU states, including Poland, wanted an option to set 10-year targets. Read more

The EU will express its preference for five-year targets “only where all parties are required to do so and in a manner consistent with EU climate law,” the ministers said in a statement.

The EU decision strengthens the negotiating position of the United States, African countries and small island states, which also support the five-year climate commitments.

They say the shorter five-year cycle would keep the pressure on countries to set ambitious targets and help determine whether they are cutting emissions quickly enough to avoid catastrophic climate change.

They also fear that 10-year pledges will allow countries with lower climate targets to go unnoticed for an entire decade.

China and India are among the countries opposed to a single calendar.

Establishing a commitment to the Paris Agreement every five years would not necessarily change the EU’s legally binding targets to reduce emissions by 2030 and 2050. Brussels will also set an emissions reduction target. for 2040.

For example, the EU could submit a 2035 climate pledge to the UN which would estimate where its emissions need to be that year, to stay on track for its 2040 target.

Reporting by Kate Abnett; Editing by Hugh Lawson

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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