European law – Europa Site http://europasite.net/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 17:49:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://europasite.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T150327.373-150x150.png European law – Europa Site http://europasite.net/ 32 32 European mayors tricked by calls with fake mayor of Kyiv https://europasite.net/european-mayors-tricked-by-calls-with-fake-mayor-of-kyiv/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 15:35:51 +0000 https://europasite.net/european-mayors-tricked-by-calls-with-fake-mayor-of-kyiv/ The mayor of Ukraine’s capital of Kyiv warned on Saturday that an impostor was impersonating him and communicating with other officials, including three European mayors who were tricked into thinking they had a video call with the real one Vitali Klitschko. “Several mayors in Europe have been contacted by a fake mayor of Kyiv who […]]]>

The mayor of Ukraine’s capital of Kyiv warned on Saturday that an impostor was impersonating him and communicating with other officials, including three European mayors who were tricked into thinking they had a video call with the real one Vitali Klitschko.

“Several mayors in Europe have been contacted by a fake mayor of Kyiv who makes nonsense,” Klitschko told German daily Bild.

“This is criminal energy. There is an urgent need to investigate who is behind this. Berlin Mayor Franziska Giffey’s office tweeted on Friday evening that she had interrupted a call with the reputable mayor of Kyiv after her comments and questions made her suspicious.

“The course of the conversation and the definition of the topics” made Giffey suspicious, her office said without giving further details.

The office published a photo showing both the mayor of the German capital and the fake Klitschko on the big screen.

He said that initially, “there was no evidence that the videoconference was not conducted with a real person. To all appearances, this is deeply false”.

Police were investigating the incident, Giffey’s office said.

On Friday, Madrid Mayor José Luis Martínez-Almeida also interrupted a video call with someone claiming to be Klitschko.

The mayor of the Spanish capital suspected he was not speaking with his counterpart in Kyiv and filed a complaint with the police.

Vienna Mayor Michael Ludwig did not end his call with the impostor earlier this week because he did not notice any suspicious behavior, Austrian public broadcaster ORF reported.

“As no sensitive topics were brought up in the conversation, it’s certainly boring on the specific occasion, but it’s not a big deal,” Ludwig said.

It was unclear who was behind the calls or what means were used to try to trick the mayors into thinking they were communicating with Klitschko.

On Saturday, the mayor of Berlin said her meeting with the fraudster meant that “in the future we will have to be even more scrutinizing, even more suspicious”.

She called the use of a fake Klitschko a “modern means of warfare”, referring to Russia’s four-month war against Ukraine.

The current mayor of Kyiv also made a connection with Russia’s war in Ukraine.

“Friends! The enemy is not giving up and is waging war on all fronts – including through disinformation, discrediting Ukrainian politicians,’ Klitschko said in a message on the Telegram messaging app.

“In order to quarrel with European partners, so that Ukraine is not helped.” In his remarks to Bild, he warned other EU officials to be cautious if contacted by someone claiming to represent his office.

“Please pay attention in the future to how appointments are organized by me. Official conversations only go through official channels,” he said.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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6th Russian sanctions package adopted in the European Union https://europasite.net/6th-russian-sanctions-package-adopted-in-the-european-union/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 00:04:49 +0000 https://europasite.net/6th-russian-sanctions-package-adopted-in-the-european-union/ On June 3, 2022, the EU announced that it had adopted a sixth set of restrictive measures against the Russian Federation as it continues its aggression against Ukraine. The latest package also imposes new sanctions on Belarus given its involvement in this aggression. Oil import restrictions A total import ban has been imposed on all […]]]>

On June 3, 2022, the EU announced that it had adopted a sixth set of restrictive measures against the Russian Federation as it continues its aggression against Ukraine. The latest package also imposes new sanctions on Belarus given its involvement in this aggression.

Oil import restrictions

A total import ban has been imposed on all Russian countries maritime crude oil and oil products. However, this does not mean a total ban on everything imports of Russian oil into the Union; the ban covers 90% of current oil imports from Russia.

An exemption for crude oil pipeline was adopted because some Member States, in particular Eastern European countries such as Hungary, Slovakia or the Czech Republic, depend specifically on Russia for their gas pipelines. Therefore, they are granted a temporary exemption and will continue to receive crude oil delivered by pipeline until the Board decides otherwise. However, after a transitional period of eight months, these Member States will no longer be able to resell crude oil and petroleum products imported by pipeline to other Member States or to third countries. This ensures a level playing field between Member States.

However, the embargo does not come into force overnight; the ban is subject to certain transition periods, which will allow the EU and its partners to secure alternative supplies and minimize the impact on world oil prices. The transition periods are 6 months for crude oil and 8 months for other refined petroleum products.

Furthermore, the ban does not apply to crude oil and petroleum products originating in a third country and only loaded in Russia, coming from or transiting through Russia, provided that the origin and the owner of these goods are not Russian.

In 2021 alone, the EU imported €48 billion of crude oil and €23 billion of refined petroleum products from Russia. Therefore, the impact of this ban on Russia is expected to be significant, as exports to the EU account for around half of Russia’s total oil exports.

In addition, new bans on oil transport services have been adopted. EU operators will no longer be allowed to finance and ensure the transport of oil to third countries, in particular by sea. The restriction is subject to a transition period of 6 months. Since EU operators are important providers of these transport services, the ban will make it particularly difficult for Russia to continue exporting crude oil and petroleum products to the rest of the world.

Export Restrictions

The EU has expanded the list of high-tech items banned from export to Russia to include additional chemicals, which could be used for the manufacture of chemical weapons. These chemicals have been under control since 2013 with respect to Syria. Some exemptions apply.

This ban accounts for approximately €663 million of EU exports to Russia.

Financial and business services measures

Three Russian banks, Sberbank, Credit Bank of Moscow and Russian Agricultural Bank, and a Belarusian bank, Belinvestbank, also known as Bank for Development and Reconstruction, were removed from SWIFT. The move actually took place on June 14, 2022.

In addition, the provision of certain services such as accounting, auditing, including statutory audit, accounting and tax consulting services, business and management consulting and public relations services to the Russian government , as well as legal persons, entities or bodies established in Russia are now prohibited.

The prohibition does not apply to the provision of services intended for the exclusive use of legal persons, entities or bodies established in Russia which are owned by, or controlled solely or jointly by, a legal person, a entity or body, which is incorporated or constituted under the law of a Member State. Therefore, a wholly-owned Russian subsidiary of an EU-incorporated company could benefit from this exception.

In addition, certain restrictions regarding trusts (trust funds) and similar legal arrangements, the founders and/or beneficiaries of which are Russian nationals, legal persons established in Russia or legal entities owned, controlled or acting on behalf of above-mentioned persons, were adopted. It is prohibited to register, provide a registered office (or business or administrative address) and provide management services to such trusts. However, the restrictions do not apply if the trustee or the beneficiary is a national of a Member State or a natural person holding a temporary or permanent residence permit in a Member State. It follows that the exemption cannot apply if the founder or the beneficiary is a legal person.

Suspend broadcast

The broadcasting activities of three Russian state media, which are among the Kremlin’s most important disinformation channels, specifically targeting audiences in Ukraine and the EU, have been suspended. Namely, these are Rossiya RTR/RTR Planeta, Rossiya 24/Russia 24 and TV Center International. These outlets are not permitted to distribute their content in the EU by any means, such as cable, satellite, internet, or via smartphone apps. Additionally, advertising of products or services on these sanctioned outlets has also been prohibited.

List of sanctions

65 people and 18 additional entities were sanctioned. Among the 65 people listed are military officials, politicians, propagandists, prominent businessmen and family members of previously sanctioned individuals.

Among the 18 sanctioned entities are several companies supporting the Russian Federation’s armed forces and government, including Russia’s largest securities depository, the National Settlement Depository.

As of 21 June 2022, the EU restrictive measures apply to a total of 1,158 individuals and 98 entities, who are subject to an asset freeze and EU nationals are prohibited from putting funds at their disposal. In addition, natural persons are subject to a travel ban, which prevents them from entering or transiting EU territory.

© Copyright 2022 Squire Patton Boggs (USA) LLPNational Law Review, Volume XII, Number 174

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MarketAxess, Tradeweb and Bloomberg plan joint EU bond price feed https://europasite.net/marketaxess-tradeweb-and-bloomberg-plan-joint-eu-bond-price-feed/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 07:38:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/marketaxess-tradeweb-and-bloomberg-plan-joint-eu-bond-price-feed/ The euro sign is pictured in front of the former headquarters of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany April 9, 2019. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register LONDON, June 22 (Reuters) – MarketAxess, Tradeweb and Bloomberg said on Wednesday they were exploring a single price stream for corporate and […]]]>

The euro sign is pictured in front of the former headquarters of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, Germany April 9, 2019. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

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LONDON, June 22 (Reuters) – MarketAxess, Tradeweb and Bloomberg said on Wednesday they were exploring a single price stream for corporate and government bonds in the European Union as the bloc seeks to better integrate its capital market.

The EU plans to change its securities rules to require a single price stream, or “consolidated band”, of trading across different platforms in the bloc for investors and banks, helping to tighten markets and improve data quality.

“The Consolidated Band Service is expected to be provided – subject to relevant regulatory approvals – through a joint venture established and operated independently of our respective businesses,” Tradeweb, MarketAxess and Bloomberg said in a joint statement.

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All three already manage their own Approved Publishing Agreements (APAs) for transaction reporting.

The bill is being negotiated by EU states and the European Parliament, but it is unclear when the final green light will be given as stock exchanges push back on the operation of a strip for stocks. Read more

There are already bands of stocks and bonds in US markets, and Britain is also considering a band in the fixed income market.

The EU is considering bands for a range of asset classes, with the procurement process, authorization and oversight handled by the bloc’s European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA).

“We believe the draft legislative revisions proposed by the European Commission would open a window to develop a strong consolidated band that will increase market transparency and help facilitate a single, integrated European capital market,” the three companies said.

“As a next step, we are preparing a competitive information process request to review independent third-party technology and operating partner(s) for the Consolidated Band Service.”

A key problem for a bond band to solve is how to better normalize deferrals, or the length of time data is released after the trade to make a band more timely.

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Reporting by Huw Jones Editing by Mark Potter

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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As death toll rises, EU has won ruthless race to the bottom against migrants and asylum seekers – Reuters https://europasite.net/as-death-toll-rises-eu-has-won-ruthless-race-to-the-bottom-against-migrants-and-asylum-seekers-reuters/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 13:28:08 +0000 https://europasite.net/as-death-toll-rises-eu-has-won-ruthless-race-to-the-bottom-against-migrants-and-asylum-seekers-reuters/ Geneva – This year has not been easy for people on the move from the southern shore of the Mediterranean. The pandemic persisted, levels of forced displacement increased, structural problems in European immigration policy persisted with new disturbing proposals and crises, and European governments continued to violate people’s right to seek asylum. . The first […]]]>

Geneva – This year has not been easy for people on the move from the southern shore of the Mediterranean. The pandemic persisted, levels of forced displacement increased, structural problems in European immigration policy persisted with new disturbing proposals and crises, and European governments continued to violate people’s right to seek asylum. .

The first direct consequence of European immigration policies, mainly pushbacks and the lack of regular, accessible and safe routes to enter Europe, has been an increasing number of deaths at European borders. Asylum seekers and migrants who tried to access the EU last year in search of safety and dignity have struggled to simply survive.

In February, 12 people were found frozen to death on the Turkish border, victims of illegal Greek pushbacks and inhuman European political games trapping asylum seekers and migrants in neglected no man’s lands.

In 2021, the number of those who arrived in Europe by land or sea and those who could not see a noticeable increase. The official number of arrivals by sea and land in frontline states is 123,318. Meanwhile, those who disappeared in the attempt are 3,231, double the previous year. In 2022, as of June 12, the number of people reaching Europe is 41,140, ​​and around 742 people have already died or disappeared in just six months while trying to reach the European Union.

The negligence of the European institutions with regard to the protection of the life and death of asylum seekers and migrants is evident in the numerous policies implemented throughout the past year by the Member States of the EU, brutalize and discriminate against migrants, asylum seekers and refugees.

The UK has stepped up its long list of draconian and inhumane measures to prevent small boats from crossing the English Channel, particularly with the recent agreement with the government of Rwanda, reached in April 2022, to transfer arriving asylum seekers in the UK and ‘externalise’ asylum there.

The drive and efforts to outsource responsibility for asylum have seen a worrying development in the past year, with the European Commission itself proposing in February a status agreement in Senegal to deploy Frontex teams of permanent corps and of technical equipment, based on the false premise of the fight against smuggling but in reality as a new, stricter strategy of containing migration.

These outsourcing proposals are fueling a ruthless race to the bottom between governments in Europe, where success is measured by fewer arrivals rather than the level of integration and physical and mental well-being of refugees within the host society. On the contrary, refugees are often ignored or even openly subjugated.

Denmark has increasingly tightened its immigration policies and now has some of the most restrictive rules in Europe, aiming to have “zero asylum applications”. In September, for example, the Danish government offered to make refugee women work at least 37 hours a week to continue receiving social benefits. Meanwhile, they continue to spread misguided and discriminatory ideas about refugees and turn rights into privileges that must be earned and deserved.

Indeed, it is not a question of European government resources, but of stories and priorities. In December, in the middle of winter, France, the Netherlands and Belgium once again made asylum seekers sleep on the streets, without unforeseeable emergencies or massive arrivals, but clearly for structural problems that recur every year.

Meanwhile, in a growing number of EU countries, migrants and asylum seekers are treated like criminals and guinea pigs to test new invasive control and surveillance technologies that increasingly require their life and their body. In October, the Swiss Parliament agreed to allow the State Secretariat for Migration to search the mobile phones of asylum seekers without proper consent or suspicion of misrepresentation, as is already done in Germany, Denmark and in Norway, where asylum seekers are treated illegally. as liars until proven otherwise.

Asylum seekers in Europe have faced two additional critical situations over the past year and a half: the Belarusian border crisis and the Ukrainian-Russian war.

The political standoff between Poland, Belarus, Lithuania and the EU itself has for months imprisoned migrants and asylum seekers amid impenetrable and deadly borders, treating them as mere geopolitical hostages, especially along the Polish-Belarusian border. This is also due to the illegitimate state of emergency imposed by Poland, preventing humanitarian actors from helping people in need in this area.

Ultimately, the Ukrainian refugee crisis in particular exposed a deeply rooted racist European policy that excludes and discriminates against non-European ethnicities, even in the midst of war. As a glaring example, until April 17, at least 45 black and brown migrants and asylum seekers remained trapped in the Zhuravychi migrant detention center in Ukraine, in the middle of a war zone, only because of their irregular migration status.

After the Russian invasion of Ukraine on February 24, a different ethical and political compass was lit towards the thousands of Ukrainians fleeing their homes, even in states ruled by nationalist governments historically reluctant to take in refugees. Denmark’s exemption of Ukrainian refugees from the controversial “jewelry law”, which still applied to asylum seekers from the Middle East and North Africa, and the opening of new medical clinics to treat only Ukrainian refugees are two glaring examples of this double standard.

Everywhere in Europe, the war in Ukraine has even aggravated the systematic discrimination suffered by non-Ukrainian asylum seekers, particularly at the Serbian-Hungarian border, where the climate resembles a “migratory apartheid”.

To commemorate this year’s World Refugee Day, Euro-Med Human Rights Monitor wishes to recall that while the European Commission rightfully stands with Ukrainian refugees, all other refugees are still on the move, lingering in limbo of growing cruelty, abandonment, and invisibility. They are routinely abused by law enforcement officials, subjected to intimidation and outright violence, physically driven from national territories and prevented from seeking international protection, mostly with impunity.

“Irregular asylum seekers do not exist. Irregulars are just the pathways for asylum seekers to come to Europe,” said Michela Pugliese, migration and asylum researcher at Euro-Med Monitor.

“European states should learn from how they responded to the war in Ukraine this year, remembering that anyone, anywhere can become an asylum seeker in need of protection. They should also always consider people’s free choice in their own lives, starting with where to go to seek asylum and settle, instead of just focusing on closing their borders and toughening immigration rules, which are literally ineffective measures for everyone.”

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EU: Turkish Cypriots must curb arrivals of migrants in Cyprus https://europasite.net/eu-turkish-cypriots-must-curb-arrivals-of-migrants-in-cyprus/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:03:02 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-turkish-cypriots-must-curb-arrivals-of-migrants-in-cyprus/ NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Dissident Turkish Cypriots in ethnically divided Cyprus must do their part to stem the arrival of migrants, a senior European Union official said on Saturday, as the number of asylum seekers asylum has increased significantly so far this year. European Commission Vice-President Margharitis Schinas said Turkish Cypriot authorities should also be […]]]>

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Dissident Turkish Cypriots in ethnically divided Cyprus must do their part to stem the arrival of migrants, a senior European Union official said on Saturday, as the number of asylum seekers asylum has increased significantly so far this year.

European Commission Vice-President Margharitis Schinas said Turkish Cypriot authorities should also be held accountable for limiting migrant arrivals.

“We will not let the Turkish Cypriot community view themselves as neutral in what is happening,” Schinas said after touring improved facilities at the Pournara migrant reception camp outside the capital. “They also have to take their share of responsibility and we will find a way to remind them.”

Cyprus was divided along ethnic lines in 1974 during the Turkish invasion following a coup aimed at union with Greece. Only Turkey recognizes a Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence. Cypriot government authorities say the overwhelming majority of migrant arrivals are via Turkey and the Turkish Cypriot north via a loosely regulated student visa system.

Thousands of people then cross a porous UN-controlled buffer zone to seek asylum in southern Greek Cypriot where the internationally recognized government is based. Although Turkish Cypriots receive EU funding, only the south enjoys all the benefits of membership.

Schinas said EU Commissioner Elisa Ferreira will hold contacts in Cyprus in July to explore the best ways to handle the problem. He also said that Turkey has demonstrated its willingness to help reduce the number of migrants arriving in Cyprus.

The EU will also help the Cypriot authorities to strengthen control and surveillance of the buffer zone to deter crossings in a manner compatible with EU law since the 180 kilometer (120 mile) long zone n is not an official boundary, Schinas said.

Cypriot Interior Minister Nicos Nouris said the number of asylum seekers had doubled to 10,000 in the first five months of this year compared to the same period in 2021, repeating that they represented a European top 5% of the 915,000 inhabitants of Cyprus in the south.

He said the Cypriot authorities were working with the EU to facilitate the return of asylum seekers whose claims have been rejected as well as additional funding from the bloc of 27 member countries to the tune of 72 million euros to build a new reception center for migrants.

Although overcrowding at the Pournara center has eased considerably in recent months, a 27-year-old Nigerian, Miracle Chidiebera, said there was still a lot of anger among migrants over what he described as a shortage chronic water, bad food and crowded facilities.

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Follow AP’s coverage of migration issues at https://apnews.com/hub/migration

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European legislation would force Big Tech to do more to tackle child sexual abuse, but a key question remains: how? https://europasite.net/european-legislation-would-force-big-tech-to-do-more-to-tackle-child-sexual-abuse-but-a-key-question-remains-how/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 12:30:22 +0000 https://europasite.net/european-legislation-would-force-big-tech-to-do-more-to-tackle-child-sexual-abuse-but-a-key-question-remains-how/ The European Commission recently proposed regulations to protect children by requiring tech companies to scan the content of their systems for child pornography. This is an extraordinarily large and ambitious effort that would have wide implications beyond the borders of the European Union, including in the United States. Unfortunately, the proposed regulations are, for the […]]]>

The European Commission recently proposed regulations to protect children by requiring tech companies to scan the content of their systems for child pornography. This is an extraordinarily large and ambitious effort that would have wide implications beyond the borders of the European Union, including in the United States.

Unfortunately, the proposed regulations are, for the most part, technologically unfeasible. To the extent that they might work, they require breaking end-to-end encryption, which would allow tech companies — and potentially government and hackers — to see private communications.

The regulations, proposed on May 11, 2022, would impose several obligations on technology companies that host content and provide communication services, including social media platforms, texting services and direct messaging applications, to detect certain categories of images and text.

Under the proposal, these companies would be required to detect previously identified child sexual exploitation material, new child sexual exploitation material and solicitations of children for sexual purposes. Companies would be required to report detected content to the EU Centre, a centralized coordination entity that the proposed regulations would establish.

Each of these categories presents its own challenges, which combine to make the proposed regulations impossible to implement as a whole. The trade-off between protecting children and protecting user privacy underscores how tackling online child sexual abuse is a “tricky issue”. This puts tech companies in a difficult position: forced to comply with regulations that serve a worthy purpose but without the means to do so.

Digital fingerprints

For more than a decade, researchers have known how to detect previously identified child sexual abuse material. This method, first developed by Microsoft, assigns a “hash value” – a kind of fingerprint – to an image, which can then be compared against a database of previously identified child sexual abuse material. and chopped. In the United States, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children maintains several databases of hash values, and some tech companies maintain their own sets of hashes.

The hash values ​​of images uploaded or shared using a company’s services are checked against these databases to detect previously identified child sexual abuse material. This method has proven to be extremely accurate, reliable and fast, which is essential to make any technical solution scalable.

The problem is that many privacy advocates view it as incompatible with end-to-end encryption, which, strictly speaking, means that only the sender and intended recipient can view the content. Since proposed EU regulations require tech companies to report any detected child sexual abuse material to the EU Centre, this would violate end-to-end encryption, thus forcing a trade-off between effective detection of harmful material and user privacy.

Here’s how end-to-end encryption works and which popular messaging apps use it.

Recognize new harmful materials

In the case of new content, i.e. images and videos not included in hash databases, there is no proven technical solution. The best engineers have worked on this problem, creating and training AI tools capable of handling large volumes of data. Both Google and child safety nongovernmental organization Thorn have had some success using machine learning classifiers to help companies identify potential new child sexual abuse content.

However, without independently verified data on the accuracy of the tools, it is not possible to assess their usefulness. Even though the accuracy and speed are comparable to hash-matching technology, mandatory signaling will again break the end-to-end encryption.

The new content also includes live streams, but the proposed regulations seem to ignore the unique challenges this technology poses. Livestreaming technology has become ubiquitous during the pandemic, and the production of child sexual exploitation material from livestreamed content has increased dramatically.

More and more children are encouraged or coerced into broadcasting sexually explicit acts live, which the viewer can record or capture on screen. Child safety organizations have noted that the production of “first person perceived child sexual abuse material” – that is, child sexual abuse material of apparent selfies – has grown at an exponential rate in recent years. Additionally, traffickers can livestream child sexual abuse for offenders who pay to watch.

The circumstances that lead to the recording and live streaming of child sexual exploitation material are very different, but the technology is the same. And there is currently no technical solution that can detect the production of child sexual exploitation material as it occurs. Tech security firm SafeToNet is developing a real-time detection tool, but it’s not ready for launch.

Detect solicitations

The detection of the third category, “prompt language”, is also difficult. The tech industry has gone to great lengths to identify the indicators needed to identify solicitation and incitement language, but with mixed results. Microsoft led the Artemis project, which led to the development of the anti-grooming tool. The tool is designed to detect incitement and solicitation of a child for sexual purposes.

However, as specified in the draft regulation, the accuracy of this tool is 88%. In 2020, the popular messaging app WhatsApp delivered around 100 billion messages per day. If the tool identifies even 0.01% of posts as “positive” for the solicitation language, human reviewers would be tasked with reading 10 million posts each day to identify the 12% that are false positives, which would make the tool simply impractical.

As with all the detection methods mentioned above, this too would break the end-to-end encryption. But while others may be limited to examining a hash value of an image, this tool requires access to all the text exchanged.

no way

It is possible that the European Commission is taking such an ambitious approach in hopes of spurring technical innovation that would lead to more accurate and reliable detection methods. However, without existing tools that can accomplish these mandates, regulations are ineffective.

When there is a mandate to act but there is no path forward, I believe disconnection will simply leave the industry without the clear guidance and direction that these regulations are meant to provide.

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EU votes to keep petrol/diesel car sales ban from 2035 https://europasite.net/eu-votes-to-keep-petrol-diesel-car-sales-ban-from-2035/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:57:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-votes-to-keep-petrol-diesel-car-sales-ban-from-2035/ In July 2021, the European Commission published a formal plan which covered renewable energy sources, building renovation and a proposal to ban the sale of new cars with combustion engines from 2035. The green strategy was widely debated and some of the largest economies in the European Union were not particularly happy with the planned […]]]>

In July 2021, the European Commission published a formal plan which covered renewable energy sources, building renovation and a proposal to ban the sale of new cars with combustion engines from 2035.

The green strategy was widely debated and some of the largest economies in the European Union were not particularly happy with the planned sales ban. However, earlier this week EU lawmakers voted to keep the ICE ban from the middle of the next decade.

The final form of the law will be discussed with member states later this year, although it is already known that the plan calls for carmakers to reduce CO2 emissions from their fleets by 100% by 2035. Basically, this means no petrol, diesel, or hybrid vehicles will be available on the new car market in the European Union. It is important to note that this ban does not mean that existing combustion engines will be banned from the streets.

The vote earlier this week doesn’t effectively kill the combustion engine in Europe, however – not yet. Before that happens, an agreement between the 27 EU countries must be reached and it could be a very difficult task. Germany, for example, opposes a total ban on new cars with combustion engines and proposes an exception to the rule for vehicles powered by synthetic fuels. The Italian Minister for Ecological Transition also said that the future of the car “cannot be all-electric only”.

In its first statement following the new agreement, Germany’s ADAC, Europe’s largest automotive association, said “ambitious climate protection goals in transport cannot be achieved by electric mobility alone”. The organization considers that “it is necessary to open up the prospect of a climate-neutral internal combustion engine.

On the other hand, Member of the European Parliament Michael Bloss said: “This is a turning point that we are discussing today. Anyone who continues to rely on the internal combustion engine harms industry, the climate and violates European law.

About a quarter of CO2 emissions in the European Union come from the transport sector and 12% of these emissions come from passenger cars. According to the new agreement, from 2030, annual emissions from new cars should be 55% lower than in 2021.

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Reviews | This anti-abortion argument has forgotten that women are people too. https://europasite.net/reviews-this-anti-abortion-argument-has-forgotten-that-women-are-people-too/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/reviews-this-anti-abortion-argument-has-forgotten-that-women-are-people-too/ Placeholder while loading article actions If anyone is looking for proof that pro-forced birth fanatics (a more accurate term than “pro-life”) won’t stop until they remove every vestige of privacy and reproductive rights across the United States, they need look no further than the June 6 op-ed by Robert P. George and Josh Craddock, “Even […]]]>
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If anyone is looking for proof that pro-forced birth fanatics (a more accurate term than “pro-life”) won’t stop until they remove every vestige of privacy and reproductive rights across the United States, they need look no further than the June 6 op-ed by Robert P. George and Josh Craddock, “Even if Roe is overthrown, Congress must act to protect the child at be born.”

Contrary to their opening salvo, no blue state is considering “legislation to allow abortion up to the very point of birth.” No, what these states are doing is ensuring that women have full access to medical care, a right protected by the same 14th Amendment that Mr. George and Mr. Craddock have repeatedly invoked. It is also a position that most Americans support, although it is apparently irrelevant to the authors.

They used a similar rhetorical sleight of hand claiming that it is “a false and pseudo-original approach” for their detractors to claim that the 14th Amendment does not protect the unborn child “because he was the more immediately intended to protect black Americans”. In fact, that’s a completely accurate statement. Even a cursory reading of post-Civil War legislative debate confirms that the rights of the unborn were not a consideration at all for proponents of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.

Beyond these grotesque distortions, only once in their sweeping endorsement of a federal constitutional ban on abortion did the authors bother to refer to mothers or women. In their world, apparently, the rights of unborn children do not only trump those of adults. They replace them. And as such, Mr. George and Mr. Craddock’s closing anthem to ensure “equal justice for all” rings horribly hollow.

Steven Alan Honley, Washington

In their op-ed, Robert P. George and Josh Craddock argued that Congress should enforce what they claim is the 14th Amendment’s use of the word “person” to include any child living in the womb. They then jumped to the additional claim that a child begins at conception.

Leaving aside the historical issues over which their argument has slipped, it should be noted that nowhere did the authors mention that Congress should help women who have unwanted pregnancies, or, for that matter, any pregnancy. By focusing on what they call unborn children, they seemed to forget that women too are “persons” and that their needs must also be met. Surely the authors could have added at least one sentence urging Congress to provide pregnant women and mothers with comprehensive health care, financial assistance, and protections from employers who threaten their jobs.

To overlook that women are people could have been accidental. Many readers will think otherwise. The editorial’s argument was consistent with a long history of viewing pregnancy as a problem that women must manage on their own within the framework of rules written by men. If men do not want to pay the costs of pregnancy or, like Mr. George and Mr. Craddock, include them in the assessment of continuing pregnancies, they should say so. It’s not just women who have a moral choice.

The 14th Amendment, Civil Rights Act of 1866, etc., were measures to clean up human rights principles compromised by Federalists in founding documents establishing inequalities in slaveowner representation and tolerance of slavery, that is, the treatment of people as property. These amendments were to extend the rights and fruits promised by the Constitution to the black population enfranchised during the Civil War. They are not exhaustive delimitations of the personality or its fruits. These amendments were intended to correct the abuses of slavery in the interpretation of personality.

The Victorian laws of England do not align well with the legal codes of most European countries. Most European law derives from the various codifications of the Roman Empire. Roman law considered the unborn child as a “potential person”. And, once born, the child would immediately acquire inheritance rights; the unborn child had no right to inherit property.

The use of “infant” or “child” for all stages of pregnancy should have been dropped along with many other Victorian misconceptions. The essence of the character lies in the identification of the human form. The umbilical cord is the knot of matter for the human form. The Victorians don’t seem to notice that middle-aged people, children, and infants, for all intents and purposes, don’t have an umbilical cord. Check it out! They don’t! And, ethically, that umbilical cord makes a big difference in how choices should be made.

Human design and development can be illegitimate, unwanted, planned and/or controlled. No one is more interested than the main invested person: the mother.

Bruce Mathews, Catonsville

In their editorial, Robert P. George and Josh Craddock made a compelling case for “equal rights for our little brothers and sisters at the dawn of their lives”. They did this by repeatedly referring to “unborn children”, with one dismissive occurrence of the word “mother” and one wonderfully reductive use of the word “womb”. Like the Constitution they analyze so carefully, they never use the word “woman”.

The obvious result of calling abortion “homicidal” is that the “womb” will have no higher rights than the zygote. Criminalizing any form of reproductive choice inevitably requires criminalizing the pregnant person who sought it out. Very soon, a woman’s right to life-saving medical care will be sacrificed to save the fetus.

Many analysts have shown in painful detail the financial and emotional damage suffered by women forced into childbirth and the damage done to the interests of their existing children and their wider communities. Suffering is the point.

As birth control methods are increasingly restricted by these same right-thinking men, it is clear that punishing any woman or girl who has sex is the goal of the anti-abortion movement.

Somehow it has become a “Christian” tenet of faith to control the sex lives of women and homosexuals. Yet the only thing I remember Jesus saying about sexual mores was when the Pharisees prepared to stone an “adulterer” (note that the man involved was apparently blameless) and offered to Jesus the honor of casting the first stone. He said, “Let him that is without sin cast the first stone. »

Katherine Crump Wiesner, Washington

Robert P. George and Josh Craddock claimed that the life of a fetus begins at conception. When does life begin is a tough question best left to the experts.

Fortunately, an undisputed expert has taken care of this question: Immanuel Kant. “Critique of Pure Reason”, edition 1781, pages 341 to 405 of the German text, in particular 384, deals at length with the state of the soul in the life of a human being, the soul in and before birth of that being, and the soul in and after the death of that being. Kant shows that he cannot provide answers to these questions. But no one else, he establishes, can either.

A statement that life begins at some point should not be taken as a statement of fact.

Wilbur H. Friedman, Rockville

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The most trusted institutions of the Poles in NATO, the military and the EU; the government, the state media and the constitutional court the least https://europasite.net/the-most-trusted-institutions-of-the-poles-in-nato-the-military-and-the-eu-the-government-the-state-media-and-the-constitutional-court-the-least/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 12:39:32 +0000 https://europasite.net/the-most-trusted-institutions-of-the-poles-in-nato-the-military-and-the-eu-the-government-the-state-media-and-the-constitutional-court-the-least/ NATO, the army and the European Union are the most trusted institutions in Poland, according to a survey. The government and two institutions considered to be under its influence – the public media and the Constitutional Court – are the least trustworthy. The survey on the trust of Poles in institutions has been regularly conducted […]]]>

NATO, the army and the European Union are the most trusted institutions in Poland, according to a survey. The government and two institutions considered to be under its influence – the public media and the Constitutional Court – are the least trustworthy.

The survey on the trust of Poles in institutions has been regularly conducted by the polling institute IBRiS since 2016, making it possible to compare the evolution of attitudes over time in response to events.

In the latest poll, published by the Onet news site, 82% of respondents said they trust NATO. It was 66% in January 2020 and 61% in September 2016. Distrust of NATO has fallen from 26% to 10% between 2016 and today.

Meanwhile, 79% of Poles now trust the army, compared to 68% in 2020 and 62% in September 2017. Distrust of the armed forces has fallen from 20% to 12% over this period.

The increased levels of confidence in Poland’s most important military alliance and its military come amid Russia’s war in neighboring Ukraine, which has led NATO to bolster its presence in Poland. The armed forces also played a leading role in responding to a migration crisis on the border with Belarus.

Poland launches paid voluntary military service

The third most trusted institution in Poland is the EU, with 62%. This figure has increased considerably from the 45% recorded in September 2016. During this period, the Polish government has regularly clashed with Brussels on issues such as the rule of law and refugee quotas.

The biggest increase in trust since IBRiS’s last such poll was for the police, which rose from 45% to 61% in November 2020. The latter figure was likely lowered by accusations at the time that the police used excessive force against abortion. protests. Previously, in 2017, trust in the police was 64%.

Third from the bottom is government, which is trusted by only 34%, the same figure as in 2020 but higher than the 27% recorded in 2017 and 2016. Respect for the government has also increased, from 55%. at 61%.

The state-owned media – which serves as the mouthpiece of the government – ​​also received 34%, a figure that has changed little since 2016, when it was 31%. On the other hand, 53% say they trust private media, compared to 48% in 2016.

State TV is Poles’ least trusted news source, Oxford University study finds

The least trustworthy institution is the Constitutional Court (TK), at 29%, up from 43% in 2016. Over this period, distrust rose from 33% to 52%.

After the Law and Justice (PiS) party came to power in 2015, it installed its own judges in the TK, including a new chief justice, Julia Przyłębska, who is a close associate of PiS President Jarosław Kaczyński.

This has led many to see TK as a “puppet” of the ruling party. The institution’s popularity has also been hit by its 2020 decision introducing a near-total ban on abortion, which staged one of the largest protests in Poland’s post-communist history and whose polls have regularly showed opposition from most Poles.

Three-quarters of Poles want abortion law eased amid protests over death of pregnant woman

Another institution that has experienced a long-term decline in trust is the Catholic Church. The new IBRiS survey reveals that 44% of Poles trust it. Although this is a slight increase from 40% in 2020, it is down significantly from 53% in 2017 and 58% in 2016.

The church has been plagued in recent years by revelations of child sexual abuse by priests and by the institution’s failure to address the problem. He was also accused of getting involved in politics, including advocating for the ban on abortion and supporting the PiS campaign against “LGBT ideology”.

Meanwhile, trust in the judiciary stands at 38%, up from 44% in 2016. PiS justified its overhaul of the judiciary arguing that it was aimed at improving efficiency and trust. However, critics see these policies as a violation of the rule of law and note that the courts often function less well than before.

Two institutions that have been individually included for the first time this year are the lower house of parliament, the Sejm, where the PiS-led government has a majority, and the upper house of the Senate, which is controlled by the opposition. 37% of Poles trust the Sejm and 45% the Senate.

‘Devastating’ decline in religious practice among young Poles, says Catholic primate

Main image credit: NATO/Flickr (under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

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European Commission proposals on the DEBRA Directive https://europasite.net/european-commission-proposals-on-the-debra-directive/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:19:13 +0000 https://europasite.net/european-commission-proposals-on-the-debra-directive/ On May 11, 2022, as part of the EU’s corporate tax strategy, the European Commission published a proposal for a directive providing for a debt bias reduction deduction DEBRA guideline). The proposed measure aims to help businesses access the financing they need, help them grow and become more resilient, while at the same time encouraging […]]]>

On May 11, 2022, as part of the EU’s corporate tax strategy, the European Commission published a proposal for a directive providing for a debt bias reduction deduction DEBRA guideline). The proposed measure aims to help businesses access the financing they need, help them grow and become more resilient, while at the same time encouraging businesses to finance their investments with equity rather than debt.

The pro-debt bias

Currently, most national tax systems within the EU allow companies to deduct interest payments on debt when calculating the tax base for corporation tax purposes. The same treatment does not apply to costs related to equity financing, such as dividends, which are generally not tax deductible. The pro-debt bias of these rules encourages companies to go into debt, instead of increasing equity, in order to finance growth.

The problem with excessive debt levels is that they can threaten the stability of the EU financial system, making companies more vulnerable to unforeseen fluctuations in the economic environment, leading to an increased risk of bankruptcies and, consequently, of unemployment. According to the European Commission, “the total indebtedness of non-financial corporations in the EU amounted to nearly €14.9 billion in 2020, or 111% of GDP“.

What does the new DEBRA directive offer?

In order to counter these concerns and mitigate the pro-debt bias, the European Commission originally presented proposals for the new DEBRA directive last year, in May 2021, and solicited public comments on these proposals, which which then led to the development of the draft directive. published.

The new regime aims to incentivize companies to use increased equity to finance growth, instead of going into debt. The proposed directive aims to achieve this by introducing a form of allowance for new equity-financed investments, so that they receive the same tax treatment as is currently available for debt financing. According to the proposals, once implemented, the DEBRA directive would apply to all companies subject to corporation tax in an EU member state. However, a number of exclusions have been proposed which would apply, for example, to credit institutions, insurance companies, investment companies and certain securitization entities. Unless an exclusion applies, and subject to specific conditions being met, the DEBRA directive would mean that increases in a taxpayer’s equity in a given tax year would be deductible from its base. of taxation.

As written, the DEBRA Directive would incorporate strong and specific anti-avoidance measures to ensure tax fairness, targeting schemes put in place to benefit from the new equity deduction, rather than be motivated by bona fide business justifications.

Interest deduction limitation

Unfortunately, the welcome capital allowance initiative comes with a new limitation on interest deductibility that would also be implemented by the DEBRA directive, which, if introduced in its proposed form, would be enforced in conjunction with the interest limitation rules introduced by the 2021 finance law, effective for accounting periods beginning on 1 January 2022.

This aspect is not welcome given the recent introduction of ATAD’s interest limitation rules, but it is believed that it will in some way “pay” for the additional cost to national treasuries of the abatement for equity.

The additional interest restriction would have the effect of discouraging excessive leverage while taking into account the new notional interest deduction from equity.

A 15 per cent restriction on the deductibility of excess borrowing costs (ie interest paid less interest received) would be introduced. This interest limitation rule would interact with the existing ATAD interest limitation rule such that the deductibility of excess borrowing costs would be calculated under DEBRA and then under the ATAD interest limitation rules. The taxpayer would only be entitled to deduct the lower of the two amounts in a taxation year. If the application of the ATAD rule results in a lower deductible amount, the taxpayer will have the right to carry forward or reverse the difference in accordance with Article 4 of the ATAD.

Implementation schedule?

A consultation period is currently underway and will remain open until July 12, 2022.

Subsequently, the European Commission proposed that the DEBRA Directive be transposed into the national laws of the Member States by 31 December 2021, with the provisions applying from 1 January 2024. However, a deferral period has also proposed for Member States which already apply a tax allowance on equity financing under national law. This includes Belgium, Cyprus, Italy, Malta, Poland and Portugal.

The legal basis for the draft directive is Article 115 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and therefore the unanimous approval of the European Council will be required before its implementation. It is expected that the proposed directive will undergo some modifications following negotiations between each of the 27 EU member states, in particular by those who already apply some form of tax relief on equity financing. The final form of the DEBRA Directive and the confirmed implementation timelines will of course depend on the outcome of these negotiations.

Practical considerations for businesses?

Companies falling within the scope of the proposed DEBRA directive should consider the potential impact of the proposed directive and keep an eye on the progress of the negotiations and the adoption process.

The full text of the draft DEBRA directive is available here.

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