European commission – Europa Site http://europasite.net/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:49:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://europasite.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T150327.373-150x150.png European commission – Europa Site http://europasite.net/ 32 32 Latest news on the Russian-Ukrainian war: live updates https://europasite.net/latest-news-on-the-russian-ukrainian-war-live-updates/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:44:36 +0000 https://europasite.net/latest-news-on-the-russian-ukrainian-war-live-updates/ The United States, Great Britain and their allies are preparing to ban the purchase of gold from Russia.Credit…Ilya Naymushin/Reuters The decision over the weekend to ban the purchase of newly mined and refined gold from Russia is the latest effort by the United States, Britain and their allies to hasten the wave of sanctions focused […]]]>
Credit…Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

The decision over the weekend to ban the purchase of newly mined and refined gold from Russia is the latest effort by the United States, Britain and their allies to hasten the wave of sanctions focused on Russia in response to its four-month-old invasion. from Ukraine.

The announcement, made as President Biden and other Group of 7 leaders gathered for meetings this week in Germany, builds on steps already taken to cut Russia off from the international financial system, deprive it of extra revenue that helps fund his war in Ukraine and punish Russian President Vladimir V. Putin and the wealthy corporate executives around him.

Ukraine’s allies have already banned most trade with Russia, frozen hundreds of billions of dollars in Bank of Russia assets held in their own financial institutions, and blocked Russian banks from using the messaging that underpins the international payments system known as SWIFT.

Russia, one of the world’s largest gold producers, has accelerated the mining of new gold to compensate for some of the crippled assets, said Christopher Swift, national security lawyer at Foley and Lardner.

The Bullion Market Association in London, a major hub for global gold trading, had already suspended transactions with six Russian silver and gold refineries in March.

Mr Swift, who previously worked in the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, said: “In order to offset the reserves held by Russian companies and oligarchs, they put gold online. The G7 closes access to this new gold.

Russian billionaire business tycoons have been buying gold bullion to try to soften the impact of the sanctions. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson underscored the point on Sunday, saying the move would “directly hit the Russian oligarchs”.

Whether this latest move, which is due to be officially announced on Tuesday, will also – in Mr Johnson’s words – “strike at the heart of Putin’s war machine” is more debatable.

Ukraine’s allies have struggled to keep the pressure on Mr Putin and deprive him of resources for his war machine without putting their own economy too much at risk. The balance is particularly difficult for the European Union, which is heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas.

Soaring oil prices combined with a huge appetite for fuel around the world meant that Russia raked in even more money from the sale of crude than it did before the war, despite the sale at a discount.

After weeks of tense negotiations, the European Union agreed last month to largely ban the import of Russian oil by the end of this year and to ban European countries from insuring tankers carrying oil. Russian oil. But so far the question of whether to ban Russian gas – for which a substitute is much harder to find than oil – has not been addressed. Germany’s government and industry leaders have warned that a gas embargo would spell disaster for its economy.

Speaking about the deployment of the sanctions, Jeffrey Schott, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washing, said the buildup of pressure on the Russian economy is “unfolding as expected.” He added that “if there are any surprises, it is the consistency of policy coordination across Atlantic and East Asian countries.”

The various members of the alliance have been looking for ways to increase the penalties one notch at a time. The gold ban “gives G7 governments some track and the ability to accelerate,” said Andrew Shoyer, a lawyer at Sidley who advises companies on sanctions compliance.

The distinction between newly mined and refined gold, and gold that was exported or purchased before the ban, is in line with the sanctions framework that prohibits new investment in Russian companies, while allowing existing investment, according to Mr. Shoyer.

The new ban also aims to deprive Russia of additional revenue from the export of gold, which is used for jewelry, in some industrial processes and for investment. As is often the case during crises, the buying of gold for investment has surged since the coronavirus pandemic began to upend the global economy. Investors expect it to hold its value. Central banks, including the Federal Reserve, had purchased Russian gold through intermediaries.

Last year, Russia earned more than $15 billion from its gold exports, according to the British government. Since gold is largely held in reserve by central banks around the world, Russia had a ready market.

“Russia is a big producer of gold, and it’s a reserve asset,” said Lucrezia Reichlein, a professor at London Business School. “If they can’t sell, then that revenue stream is gone.”

After the first rounds of sanctions shut down much of its international gold trade, Russia’s central bank announced it would resume buying locally produced gold, which was also seen as a way to support its currency. The gold held by the Russian central bank is estimated at between 100 and 140 billion dollars.

“Fundamentally, this is a gradual tightening of sanctions rather than a meaningful escalation,” Mr. Swift of Foley and Lardner said. “If your goal is to undermine Russia’s economic ability to wage war in Ukraine, this is a necessary but not sufficient measure.”

But he added; “If the G7 wants to have a strategic effect, then they really need to think about what they are going to do with Russian gas.”

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12 countries without Russian gas https://europasite.net/12-countries-without-russian-gas/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 17:38:01 +0000 https://europasite.net/12-countries-without-russian-gas/ Kadri Simson, the European Commissioner for Energy, said that 12 EU states are completely or partially deprived of Russian gas. Simson added that Moscow’s behavior in recent weeks has exacerbated the risks. The commissioner said in a statement to the Estonian newspaper “Postimees”, that the crisis has been severe since the beginning of last autumn, […]]]>

Kadri Simson, the European Commissioner for Energy, said that 12 EU states are completely or partially deprived of Russian gas.

Simson added that Moscow’s behavior in recent weeks has exacerbated the risks.

The commissioner said in a statement to the Estonian newspaper “Postimees”, that the crisis has been severe since the beginning of last autumn, but that Russia’s behavior in recent weeks has greatly exacerbated the risks.

She explained that the EU crisis plan prepared at the beginning of the year can be useful at any time and that member states must be ready to implement their plans.

Simson noted that the EU reached an agreement last week to increase gas supplies with Israel and Egypt and strengthen cooperation with Norway and that direct negotiations with Azerbaijan are in their final stages.

The disagreement between the energy ministers is caused by issues related to the activities of the electricity market, as well as the expansion of nuclear energy activities, according to the commissioner.

The European Commissioner indicated that the commission cannot take a decision on this issue and that the selection of energy sources in accordance with the fundamental European treaties is the sovereign right of the Member States.

At the end of May, deliveries of Russian gas to Poland, Bulgaria, Finland and the Netherlands ceased, due to their refusal to accept the new settlement system proposed by Moscow.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said on May 9 that counties that refused to pay for Russian gas under the new rules had already cut off their gas supplies.

On June 14, “Gazprom” announced that it had to reduce the gas supply via the “North Stream” gas pipelines for technical reasons.

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EU plan for a life without Russian gas a priority as leaders meet https://europasite.net/eu-plan-for-a-life-without-russian-gas-a-priority-as-leaders-meet/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 09:46:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/eu-plan-for-a-life-without-russian-gas-a-priority-as-leaders-meet/ BRUSSELS, June 24 (Reuters) – European leaders will discuss on Friday how to respond to soaring energy prices and the threat of a complete Russian gas cut, accusing Moscow of “weaponising” energy via a supply squeeze that Germany says could partly shut down its industry this winter. A day after celebrations of putting Kyiv on […]]]>

BRUSSELS, June 24 (Reuters) – European leaders will discuss on Friday how to respond to soaring energy prices and the threat of a complete Russian gas cut, accusing Moscow of “weaponising” energy via a supply squeeze that Germany says could partly shut down its industry this winter.

A day after celebrations of putting Kyiv on the path to joining the bloc, Friday’s summit in Brussels was to be a sober reflection on the economic impact of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Read more

According to a draft summit statement seen by Reuters, the leaders of the 27 European Union countries will blame the huge price spike and slump in global growth on the war that began exactly ago four months.

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Following the unprecedented Western sanctions imposed following the invasion, a dozen European countries have so far been hit with cuts in gas flows from Russia.

“It’s only a matter of time before the Russians stop all gas supplies,” an EU official said ahead of Friday’s talks.

German Economy Minister Robert Habeck has warned that his country is heading for a gas shortage if Russian supplies remain as low as they are now, and that some industries are expected to shut down this winter.

“Companies would have to stop production, lay off their workers, supply chains would collapse, people would go into debt to pay their heating bills,” he told Der Spiegel magazine, adding that this was part of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s strategy to divide the country. . Read more

The EU depended on Russia for up to 40% of its gas needs before the war – rising to 55% for Germany – leaving a huge gap to fill in an already tight global gas market.

‘ARMING THE GAS’

According to a draft statement seen by Reuters, European leaders will say that “in the face of Russia’s weaponization of gas”, the European Commission should find ways to guarantee “supply at affordable prices”.

EU countries have already poured billions of euros in tax cuts and subsidies to combat soaring energy prices.

But it represents heavy bills for already bloated coffers, leaving many scrambling to find a solution, and EU countries disagree on a bloc-wide solution to deal with the price spike.

Spain and Portugal capped gas prices in their local electricity market this month, but other states warn price caps would disrupt energy markets and further drain government coffers. if governments had to pay the difference between the capped price and the price on international gas markets.

“We have to start buying energy collectively, we have to put price caps in place and we have to make plans together to get through the winter,” Belgian Prime Minister Alexander De Croo said on Friday upon arriving at the summit. of the EU.

“If we are not careful, the whole EU economy will go into recession with all its consequences.”

The bloc has responded to the war with unusual speed and unity, but some sanctions, such as a planned embargo on Russian oil imports, are impacting its economies.

Inflation in the 19 countries sharing the euro has reached all-time highs above 8% and the EU executive expects economic growth to fall to 2.7% this year.

Eurogroup chief Paschal Donohoe warned the bloc must “recognize the risk we could face if inflation takes root in our economies”.

“If inflation becomes a real and lasting part of our economies in the years to come, the challenge we face with the standard of living and the cost of living will only grow in the years to come. a very difficult challenge.”

Rome has called on European leaders to come together again for a one-off meeting in mid-July to discuss ways to deal with rising petrol prices, but there are no plans to do so for the moment, an EU official said.

Another EU official, however, said some European leaders were considering the possibility of holding an additional summit in July to discuss broader economic issues.

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Reporting by Phil Blenkinsop, Marine Strauss, Bart Meijer, Francesco Guarascio, Kate Abnett, Jan Strupczewski; Additional reporting by Miranda Murray in Berlin, Gianluca Semeraro in Rome; written by Jan Strupczewski, Phil Blenkinsop and Ingrid Melander; edited by John Chalmers, Sam Holmes and Alex Richardson

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Government asks European Commission for new alcohol warnings https://europasite.net/government-asks-european-commission-for-new-alcohol-warnings/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 16:25:00 +0000 https://europasite.net/government-asks-european-commission-for-new-alcohol-warnings/ The government has filed a request with the European Commission to enact regulations that would put health warnings on all alcoholic products, such as “alcohol causes liver disease” and “there is a direct link between alcohol and deadly cancers”. All cans and bottles of alcohol should also bear a symbol warning of the dangers of […]]]>

The government has filed a request with the European Commission to enact regulations that would put health warnings on all alcoholic products, such as “alcohol causes liver disease” and “there is a direct link between alcohol and deadly cancers”.

All cans and bottles of alcohol should also bear a symbol warning of the dangers of drinking alcohol during pregnancy. The measures are contained in the Public Health Alcohol Bill, which introduced a series of measures to date, including minimum prices for alcohol and restrictions on advertising at sporting events.

Under EU law, the state must notify the European Commission of any proposed technical regulation before it is implemented. Now the other Member States have three months to respond to the proposals. Any objection would delay the adoption of these measures.

However, even when it is enacted, there will be a three-year delay to reduce the impacts on companies and producers in the sector.

Proposed settlement

In addition to labels on products, the regulations also state that those who sell alcohol in licensed premises must “post a notice containing the same health warnings, a link to the public health website and an indication to the customer that the alcohol and calorie content of alcoholic products for all “poured beverages” is available in a document upon request”.

For those who sell alcohol online, these websites must also display the same information that would be available to customers in a physical store. The regulations also specify the font and font size required for these labels.

Reasoning

In a statement to the European Commission, the government set out the reasoning behind these measures.

He said: “The volume and patterns of alcohol consumption in Ireland is responsible for a huge public health burden. Data shows that the Irish population is unaware of the health risks of alcohol and the draft regulations submitted here are designed to ensure that Irish consumers are directly informed of these risks and are helped to make better choices. healthy about their alcohol consumption.

He cites data that suggests 15% of 13-year-olds have had their first drink of alcohol while more than 60% of 17-year-olds say they have been “really drunk”.

Other concerns cited include the fact that young Irish women now consume equal amounts of alcohol as young men in certain categories, the text says.

Alcohol consumption in Ireland has remained “extremely high” in recent years despite pubs being closed during Covid-19, he said, and places a “tremendous burden” on the public health service. He said it is estimated that 4% of total health expenditure will be spent on alcohol-related disease over the next 30 years unless Ireland “changes its people’s understanding and relationship with the alcohol”.

“Despite the public health burden caused by alcohol consumption here, awareness of health harms remains low, especially among young people,” he said.

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Joint statement by the European Commission and the High Representative https://europasite.net/joint-statement-by-the-european-commission-and-the-high-representative/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:54:59 +0000 https://europasite.net/joint-statement-by-the-european-commission-and-the-high-representative/ As World Refugee Day approaches, we stand with all those forced to leave their homes around the world. Amid the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world, the EU has taken decisive action to provide protection to those fleeing Russia’s war on Ukraine and secure humanitarian aid in the country and among its neighbours. Last […]]]>

As World Refugee Day approaches, we stand with all those forced to leave their homes around the world.

Amid the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world, the EU has taken decisive action to provide protection to those fleeing Russia’s war on Ukraine and secure humanitarian aid in the country and among its neighbours.

Last year, at this time, it would be unthinkable for 14 million people to be forced by Russian aggression to leave their homes in a single country at the gates of the European Union. This is the largest movement of people in Europe since the end of World War II.

The EU and its Member States have supported Ukrainians, offering refuge to more than 6 million people who have fled to neighboring countries, mainly to Poland, Romania, Hungary, Slovakia but also the Republic of Moldova. The majority of those fleeing are women and children. Children who should never have to hide from bombs and experience the horrors of war.

To this end, the EU activated the Temporary Protection Directive and has since granted temporary protection status to nearly 3.4 million people, giving them access to the EU labor market, adequate housing , social assistance, medical care and education.

Today, more than 100 million people are forcibly displaced around the world, from Afghanistan, Syria, Yemen and Myanmar to Venezuela or Burkina Faso. Working hand in hand with the UN and the international community, the EU remains one of the main humanitarian and development donors helping affected populations to access food, shelter, education, healthcare , housing, land, livelihood support and other basic services in situations around the world. Let us not forget that more than 80% of refugees in the world are hosted in developing countries.

Now more than ever, the EU remains committed to supporting people forced to leave their homes around the world. We will continue to work towards political solutions to end the reasons why people flee.

Background

The European Union maintains that the right to seek and enjoy asylum, as well as the principle of non-refoulement, as enshrined in the 1951 Convention on Refugees and in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of EU, must be observed at all times.

The EU and its Member States make an important contribution to global resettlement efforts. Since 2015, EU resettlement programs have helped over 97,000 vulnerable refugees find refuge in EU Member States, particularly in the context of the Syrian regional crisis and, more recently, the Afghan crisis. . In July 2022, the European Commission will launch the next engagement exercise to ensure EU resettlement efforts continue in the years to come.

Through the Pact on Migration and Asylum, we will further strengthen our commitments beyond our borders, pursuing these goals hand in hand with partner countries.

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The European Union has adopted new rules for trans-European energy networks https://europasite.net/the-european-union-has-adopted-new-rules-for-trans-european-energy-networks/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 05:42:23 +0000 https://europasite.net/the-european-union-has-adopted-new-rules-for-trans-european-energy-networks/ On May 30, 2022, the European Union (“EU”) adopted the revised Trans-European Energy Infrastructure Guidelines Regulation (No. 2022/869) (the “2022 TEN-E Regulation”), which replaces the previous rules laid down in Regulation 347/2013 (the “TEN-E Regulation 2013”) which aimed to improve security of supply, market integration, competition and sustainability in the energy sector. The TEN-E Regulation […]]]>

On May 30, 2022, the European Union (“EU”) adopted the revised Trans-European Energy Infrastructure Guidelines Regulation (No. 2022/869) (the “2022 TEN-E Regulation”), which replaces the previous rules laid down in Regulation 347/2013 (the “TEN-E Regulation 2013”) which aimed to improve security of supply, market integration, competition and sustainability in the energy sector. The TEN-E Regulation 2022 aims to better support the modernization of European cross-border energy infrastructure and the objectives of the EU Green Deal.

The three most important things you need to know about the TEN-E Regulation 2022:

  • Projects can qualify as Projects of Common Interest (“PCI”) and be selected from an EU list if they (i) fall within the identified priority corridors and (ii) contribute to the achievement of the objectives of EU energy and climate policy in terms of security of supply. and decarbonization. The 2022 TEN-E Regulation updates its priority corridors to meet the objectives of the EU Green Deal, while widening their scope to include projects connecting the EU to third countries, namely projects of mutual interest (“PMI”).
  • PCIs and SMIs registered on the EU list must benefit from priority status in order to ensure rapid administrative and judicial processing.
  • PCIs and SMIs will be eligible for EU financial assistance. Member States will also be able to grant financial support subject to state aid rules.

Background

Trans-European Energy Networks (“TEN-E”) is an EU policy which aims to achieve a more integrated internal energy market by linking energy infrastructure between Member States and with third countries.

In order to pursue this objective, the 2013 TEN-E Regulation identified priority corridors through different geographical regions in the field of electricity, gas and oil infrastructure in order to strengthen cross-border interconnection and help integrate renewable energies. Member States then selected and implemented PCIs within designated “priority corridors”. PCIs could then benefit from specific funding from the EU budget and an accelerated authorization procedure. This process has helped most EU Member States meet their 2020 interconnection targets and contributed to energy market integration and security of supply.

The revised TEN-E Regulation 2022 continues to work towards the development of better connected energy networks while updating the TEN-E framework to focus on the latest environmental objectives and ensure consistency with the climate neutrality objectives set out in the pact. EU green.

Towards a better integrated and greener European energy market

The 2022 TEN-E Regulation reallocates and identifies 11 priority corridors with the aim of achieving the objectives of (i) reducing carbon emissions by 55% by 2030 and (ii) achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. Priority corridors focus on upgraded infrastructure categories such as offshore power grid corridors and renewable and low-carbon gases, eg hydrogen and electrolysers. Natural gas infrastructure and pipelines will no longer be eligible for PCI status. The 2022 TEN-E Regulation also identifies new priority thematic areas: (i) adopting energy networks equipped with IT technologies (“smart networks”) for electricity and gas, respectively, and (ii) developing cross-border networks of carbon dioxide.

Proponents of energy infrastructure projects can apply for PCI status with regional priority corridor groups. PCI status can be obtained for projects focused on promoting greener and cleaner energy sources such as offshore wind capacity and renewable/low carbon hydrogen (note that hydrogen can either be blended with other gases (e.g. natural gas or biomethane) or as a carrier-sole source of energy). As part of the TEN-E 2022 regulation, PCIs concerning smart grids (gas or electricity) and the transport and storage of carbon dioxide are also encouraged.

In addition, the TEN-E 2022 regulation extends the borders of the EU energy market to third countries by introducing a new cooperation mechanism for so-called projects of mutual interest (“PMI”). Like PCIs, they can be selected if they contribute to the overall EU energy and climate policy objectives in terms of security of supply and decarbonisation.

The European Commission will adopt a list of PCIs and SMIs every two years (the “EU list”), with the first EU list to be adopted by 30 November 2023.

The TEN-E 2022 regulation also imposes a new obligation for all projects on the EU list. PCIs and PMIs must meet mandatory sustainability criteria and, in accordance with the “no significant harm” principle under the EU taxonomy regulation, they must be implemented in a way that does not impede the achievement of objectives environmental.

“Fast-track” administrative and judicial procedures for projects on the EU list

Member States must grant PCIs and SMIs the status of highest national importance, which benefits from simplified administrative processes, for example, accelerated project implementation, shorter authorization procedures, greater transparency and greater participation in consultations. To this end, Member States must designate a competent national authority responsible for facilitating and coordinating the permit granting process.

Litigation proceedings involving any dispute over a project on the EU list should be treated as urgent.

Public funding

In order to achieve the targets set in the EU Green Deal, significant public investment and funding will be needed to develop the necessary energy infrastructure. For example, it is estimated that it would cost €800 billion to increase the uptake of offshore renewables in line with EU Green Deal targets, two-thirds of which will be used for associated grid infrastructure. An additional average annual investment estimated at €50.5 billion will be needed for electricity transmission and distribution networks to meet the 2030 targets alone.

Thus, to meet the significant costs, IPCs and PMIs on the EU list may be eligible for financial assistance:

  • Financial support under the Connecting Europe Facility (“CEF”). For the period 2021-2027, the CEF program (Regulation n°2021/1153) has allocated 5.84 billion euros of its budget to the energy sector (see our blog post on cross-border projects in the field of renewable energies). Promoters of projects identified in the EU list can submit a request for financial support to the European Climate, Infrastructure and Environment Executive Agency (“CINEA”). Note that de-listing from the EU does not affect EU funding already granted, but may prevent future funding being sought.
  • State aid. EU Member States can provide financial assistance subject to state aid rules. To this end, they could assess their financial support under the General Block Exemption Regulation (“GBER”) or obtain Commission approval under the new guidelines on state aid for climate, Environmental Protection and Energy 2022 (“CEEAG”, see our blog post). Energy infrastructure projects could also be funded by EU member states if they meet the criteria defined in the IPCEI guidelines.
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Britain to defy EU by scrapping Northern Ireland trade rules https://europasite.net/britain-to-defy-eu-by-scrapping-northern-ireland-trade-rules/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 00:56:18 +0000 https://europasite.net/britain-to-defy-eu-by-scrapping-northern-ireland-trade-rules/ Post-Brexit trade: the EU believes that any unilateral change could breach international law. (Case) London: Britain will on Monday propose to override rules that govern post-Brexit trade with Northern Ireland, stoking tensions with the European Union that have simmered since the protocol came into force in 2021. When Britain left the EU, Prime Minister Boris […]]]>

Post-Brexit trade: the EU believes that any unilateral change could breach international law. (Case)

London:

Britain will on Monday propose to override rules that govern post-Brexit trade with Northern Ireland, stoking tensions with the European Union that have simmered since the protocol came into force in 2021.

When Britain left the EU, Prime Minister Boris Johnson struck a deal that effectively kept Northern Ireland in the EU’s single market and customs union to preserve the open border with the EU. Ireland Specified in the Good Friday Peace Agreement.

It imposes customs controls between the province and the rest of the UK, which pro-British communities in Northern Ireland say is eroding their place in the UK.

Johnson said the protocol’s implementation had hurt trade in the UK and threatened political stability in Northern Ireland.

The legislation will be presented to parliament by UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss.

Brussels believes that any unilateral change could violate international law. It could respond by taking legal action and imposing countermeasures, such as tariffs.

UK Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis insisted on Sunday that the legislation was within the law.

He declined to say how the protocol would be changed, but said the government would establish the legal basis for the bill.

He is expected to propose a ‘green channel’ for goods transported from Britain to Northern Ireland, as well as scrapping rules that prevent the province from receiving tax relief and ending the Court’s role European Court of Justice as sole arbiter, according to reports. .

The plan will be a test of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s authority after he was nearly removed from office last week when four in ten of his lawmakers opposed him in a confidence vote.

However, this will be seen by the EU as an inflammatory move that violates an international treaty.

European Commission Vice-President Maros Sefcovic said in May that Brussels would respond with all measures at its disposal.

Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi has said there will be no US-UK trade deal if London rolls back the protocol.

Irish Sinn Fein, the nationalist party that won a historic victory in an election in Northern Ireland last month, said Britain would “undoubtedly” break the law by imposing unilateral changes to the protocol.

“(Britain) has sought a destructive course and is now proposing to introduce legislation which will undoubtedly breach international law,” Sinn Fein President Mary Lou McDonald told Sky News.

(Except for the title, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

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60% of citizens of EU countries that have not adopted the euro support making it their currency https://europasite.net/60-of-citizens-of-eu-countries-that-have-not-adopted-the-euro-support-making-it-their-currency/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 08:18:21 +0000 https://europasite.net/60-of-citizens-of-eu-countries-that-have-not-adopted-the-euro-support-making-it-their-currency/ The European Commission has published its annual “Flash Eurobarometer” on the introduction of the euro in member countries which have not yet adopted the common currency. The Eurobarometer is a summary of public opinion polls carried out regularly on behalf of the EU institutions. The survey was conducted between 20 and 29 April 2022 in […]]]>

The European Commission has published its annual “Flash Eurobarometer” on the introduction of the euro in member countries which have not yet adopted the common currency.

The Eurobarometer is a summary of public opinion polls carried out regularly on behalf of the EU institutions. The survey was conducted between 20 and 29 April 2022 in countries that have not yet introduced the euro as a currency, namely Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Sweden, reports SchengenVisaInfo.com.

In a statement released on Friday, June 10, the European Commission also said that the survey shows broad support for the euro among citizens of these countries, revealing that on average 60% of respondents said they were in favor of the introduction of the common currency.

In addition, the countries with the most favorable adoption opinions are Romania with 77% favorable and Hungary with 69%. On the other hand, the least favorable came from Bulgaria and the Czech Republic with 44% in both cases and from Sweden with 45%.

More than half of respondents believe that the introduction of the single currency would have positive consequences for their country (55%)”, read the statement.

According to the European Commission, around 56% of people who took part in the survey believe that the introduction of the euro will lead to higher prices.

“Furthermore, the results of the survey show that the citizens of the Member States which do not yet belong to the euro zone are more aware of this subject than before: 53% of those questioned consider themselves to be informed about the euro , compared to 51% last year and 44% in 2015”, the statement also explains.

On June 6, the Commission concluded that Croatia is ready to make the euro its currency, becoming the 20th EU country to join the euro zone from next year, January 1, 2023. .

The Commission also added that only Croatia fulfills all the criteria to be part of the zone out of the other eight EU members that are not. It also notes that all the remaining Member States fulfill the public finance criteria, with the exception of Romania, which is now subject to an excessive deficit procedure.

In this regard, the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, said that joining the Eurozone will strengthen the Croatian economy and bring benefits to Croatian citizens, businesses and society.

Meanwhile, EU Executive Vice-President for an Economy that Works for People, Valdis Dombrovskis, hailed Croatia for its commitment, diligence and perseverance in trying to meet the conditions for adopting the euro. .

He also underlined that the adoption of the euro is the last step towards Croatia’s fully integrated EU membership.

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European Commission approves request to consider replacing meat industry subsidies with plant-based alternatives https://europasite.net/european-commission-approves-request-to-consider-replacing-meat-industry-subsidies-with-plant-based-alternatives/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 18:42:16 +0000 https://europasite.net/european-commission-approves-request-to-consider-replacing-meat-industry-subsidies-with-plant-based-alternatives/ The European Commission has just approved a request to launch the European Citizens’ Initiative calling for a shift in subsidies to the meat industry towards plant-based alternatives and cultured meat. This comes after June 5, which was World Environment Day and National Animal Rights Day, the European Citizens’ Initiative titled “End The Slaughter Age” began. […]]]>

The European Commission has just approved a request to launch the European Citizens’ Initiative calling for a shift in subsidies to the meat industry towards plant-based alternatives and cultured meat.

This comes after June 5, which was World Environment Day and National Animal Rights Day, the European Citizens’ Initiative titled “End The Slaughter Age” began.

Simply put, this is an official signature drive, which aims to exclude farms from European CAP (Common Agricultural Policy) subsidies for the livestock industry, to channel these funds into more green and more sustainable such as cellular agriculture and plant-based food production that does not involve killing animals.

Locally, ‘End The Slaughter Age’ is already supported by VeggyMalta, Animal Liberation Malta and Real Animal Rights.

The initiative request was also co-signed by VeggyMalta coordinator Darryl Grima, who called for a change of attitude.

“Six million animals are killed every hour for food, we need to stop this cycle. The only way for us to save our planet is to change our way of life to a more plant-based way of life,” Grima said.

“That’s why we need the European Union to stop subsidizing the meat industry and invest in plant-based alternatives and cellular agriculture,” he said.

The “End The Slaughter Age” initiative aims precisely to facilitate these ethical, sustainable and healthy alternatives for the benefit of all: animals, humans and the planet.

The launch of the ECI, considered legally admissible by the EU because it meets all the criteria established by the Lisbon Treaty of 2012, began on June 5.

The date was chosen by the organizing committee as it coincides with World Environment Day and National Animal Rights Day, a day dedicated to raising awareness of animal rights.

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Why Ukraine’s accession to the European Union is not easy https://europasite.net/why-ukraines-accession-to-the-european-union-is-not-easy/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 05:25:18 +0000 https://europasite.net/why-ukraines-accession-to-the-european-union-is-not-easy/ Ukraine has applied to join the EU, but the process is likely to take some time and it is unclear whether there is broad support for accepting several new nations into the bloc. Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images The European Union may be on the verge of lending its support to Ukraine becoming its […]]]>

Ukraine has applied to join the EU, but the process is likely to take some time and it is unclear whether there is broad support for accepting several new nations into the bloc.

Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images

The European Union may be on the verge of lending its support to Ukraine becoming its newest member, but the process will not be easy: not only is the country still at war, but several other nations wish to join – and this for some time.

Just days after Russia began its unprovoked invasion of the country, Ukraine sent a letter to the EU officially launching its application process.

Since then, several EU officials have come out in favor of Ukraine joining the bloc, but they have also made it clear that it will be a long process, even if they try to speed things up given of the situation in Ukraine.

The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, is expected to issue an opinion on Ukraine’s EU membership in the coming weeks, but that will likely only mark the start of a long and difficult journey.

Even the President of the European Parliament, Roberta Metsola, admitted that accepting new members into the EU can be difficult.

“Enlargements are always complex – you have different countries, different paths, different steps to follow, different rules to respect. But this is the moment when we have to send the strongest political message: Ukraine belongs to the European family “, she said. CNBC last month.

According to Daniel Gros of the Brussels-based think tank CEPS, receiving political support to join the EU represents “a moral boost for Ukraine and a signal to Russia that the EU will not be deterred”.

But for the EU, supporting Ukraine’s membership bid is a delicate balancing act that affects many countries.

And the others ?

Western Balkan nations have long been promised membership, for example – including North Macedonia, which has even changed its name in a bid to bolster its chances of joining the EU – but negotiations have not haven’t started yet.

Moldova, which borders Ukraine, and Georgia, which borders Russia, also applied to join the bloc following the Russian invasion.

“Particularly in the context of the war in Ukraine, we must remain vigilant and give Western banks the same priority as Ukraine,” Austrian ministers Alexander Schallenberg and Karoline Edtstadler said in a letter to the top diplomat. EU, Josep Borrell. month.

“We cannot afford to create first and second class candidates.”

Western Balkans is a term used to refer to six countries in Southern and Eastern Europe: the Republic of Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, the Republic of Kosovo, the Republic of North Macedonia and the Republic of Serbia.

The risk for the EU is that it will be seen as giving preferential treatment to Kyiv, upsetting other parts of the continent and potentially bringing them closer to Russia.

“We want and need these countries firmly rooted in our camp, that of the European model of life, we must demonstrate to them that they are key partners and that we are serious about their European future”, declared the Austrian ministers. in the letter.

The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, was not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC on Tuesday.

Even after publishing its opinion on Ukraine’s membership of the bloc, it will probably be years before member states have a chance to approve Kyiv’s membership, largely because Ukraine will have to put in place implemented several economic and political reforms to comply with European rules.

However, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has spoken out on Ukraine’s EU membership. Last month, she pleaded for financial aid for reconstruction as a way to also help Ukraine join the bloc.

“It could establish a system of milestones and targets to ensure that EU money really benefits the Ukrainian people and is spent according to EU rules. It could help fight corruption, bring the legal environment in line with European standards and radically improve Ukraine’s production capacity,” she told the European Parliament, adding that “eventually this will pave the way for Ukraine’s future within the European Union”.

‘Very difficult’

But political experts believe that Ukraine’s full membership is still a long way off.

“Although Ukraine is unlikely to join the EU anytime soon, there is a clear change in attitude towards enlargement among EU leaders who have realized that it is very frustrating to keep countries that want to become members on hold and opens the door to democratic backsliding and non-EU influence from Russia, China,” said Anna Rosenberg, partner at consultancy Signum Global, by email.

“So yes, EU leaders are now a little more open to enlargement than before the war, but it is still very difficult nonetheless – the problems with countries like Hungary are proof of that. No leader of the EU does not want to allow a second Hungary to enter the bloc.” she added.

Hungary, which joined the EU in 2004, has long been a thorn in the side of European institutions.

This is evident most recently from the decision to impose an oil embargo on Russia. The European Commission made the proposal in early May, but Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban led a coalition of a handful of countries to negotiate exclusions. This dragged out the process much longer than originally planned.

“The EU27 is often ungovernable and it is in my opinion difficult to see new members being admitted into the club without treaty revisions such as [French President Emmanuel] Macron proposed more qualified majority voting and more tax integration,” Jacob Kirkegaard of the Peterson Institute for International Economics said by email.

Currently – and as the recent standoff over the Russian oil embargo demonstrated – major foreign policy decisions require unanimity.

This is already difficult at times, given that the EU is made up of 27 countries with often totally different national priorities. And it might get even harder if the group gets bigger.

Another complication is the fact that there is currently no clarity as to when Russia’s war in Ukraine will end.

“A precondition for a meaningful accession process is not only that Ukraine wins the war in the sense that it needs to control its own territory, but that a real peace agreement is signed with Russia” , Kirkegaard said, adding that “a frozen conflict situation will not give Ukraine EU membership.”

“The question is of course how to achieve this, given that, in a sense, Moscow has a veto over Ukraine’s possible EU membership – no peace agreement, no membership ultimately to the EU.”

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